Jayce Farmer

Dr. Jayce Farmer is an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy and Leadership at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He’s an expert in public finance and state and local government administration and can provide insight on how the coronavirus has devastated state and local government budgets.

Farmer has more than a decade of experience in public fiscal administration — before joining UNLV, he worked as a policy and budget analyst for local governments in Florida. There, he coordinated and managed the capital budget process for municipalities and oversaw the implementation of several large municipal government funds.

He has also advised appointed and elected local officials and, in 2016, conducted several citizen satisfaction surveys for municipalities in Central Texas.

Farmer’s research into local government policy and fiscal issues has been published in The American Review of Public Administration, Public Budgeting and Finance, Urban Affairs Review, Public Performance & Management Review, and Publius: The Journal of Federalism.

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Expertise Field: Public finance, state and local governance, public policy, urban affairs

Contact information:

Email: Jayce.Farmer@unlv.edu 

Phone: 702-972-5878

Twitter: @JayceFarmer

Listen to Jayce Farmer on KNPR:

Tung Yin

Tung Yin is a professor of law at Lewis & Clark College. He’s an expert on national security and terrorism law and can provide context on the power of federal law enforcement in American cities.

Yin’s academic research has covered topics including indefinite military detention of suspected terrorists at Guantanamo Bay, drone strikes and race, religion and the perception of terrorism. His scholarship has been cited in judicial opinions from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth and Ninth Circuits, the Florida and Georgia Supreme Courts, and other lower state and federal trial courts.

Before joining Lewis & Clark College in 2009, Yin taught for seven years at the University of Iowa. From 1998 to 2002, he worked as a lawyer specializing in employment law and white collar corporate criminal defense at Munger Tolles & Olson LLP in Los Angeles.

Outside of the law, Yin writes about running for the Run Oregon blog.

Location: Portland, OR

Expertise: National security and terrorism law

Contact information:

Email (preferred): tyin@lclark.edu  

Phone: 503-768-6772

Twitter: @TungYin

Listen to Tung Yin on KGW:

Last updated July 30, 2020

Christen A. Smith

Dr. Christen A. Smith is an associate professor of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies and the director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She’s an expert on Black liberation and state violence against Black communities in the Americas.

Smith can provide context on the anthropological background of police violence against Black communities. Her recent research examines the lingering and deadly impacts of police violence on Black women, communities and families in the U.S. and Brazil.

Her 2016 book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil explores the ironic relationship between police violence against Black Brazilians in Salvador, Bahia and the celebration and consumption of Black culture, music and art.

Smith is also the founder of Cite Black Women, which promotes the intellectual and academic work of Black women — historically overlooked and undervalued. Through a blog, podcast and social media campaign, the project pushes people to reexamine their blind spots on race and gender and start using and citing the work of Black female sources.

Location: Austin, TX

Expertise: Black liberation, resistance and state violence against Black communities in the Americas

Contact information:

Email: christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @profsassy

Listen to Christen A. Smith on KQED’s World Affairs:

Last updated July 22, 2020

Kartik Cherabuddi

Dr. Kartik Cherabuddi is a clinical associate professor of infectious diseases at the University of Florida and the hospital epidemiologist and director of antimicrobial stewardship at UF Health.

As an expert on infectious diseases, Cherabuddi can provide insight into the current coronavirus situation in Florida and how things will develop over the coming weeks.

At UF Health, Cherabuddi provides specialist care to patients with complex infectious diseases, HIV and antibiotic resistant infections. Outside of COVID-19, Cherabuddi’s research includes antibiotic resistance and genetic sequencing, and he collaborates with the university’s Emerging Pathogens Institute on emerging viral diseases like the Zika, Chikungunya and Keystone viruses.

Location: Gainesville, FL

Expertise: Infectious diseases and coronavirus in Florida

Contact information:

Email (preferred): cherabuddi@ufl.edu

Phone (office): 352-294-5481

Twitter: @kartc

Listen to Kartik Cherabuddi on WUSF:

Last updated July 16, 2020

An Xiao Mina

An Xiao Mina works on program strategy and operations at Meedan, a technology non-profit that builds software for newsrooms and NGOs to improve the quality of information online. She’s an expert on digital creative culture and how memes influence protest movements and politics.

Internet memes have gone from silly image macros to salvos in cultural and political struggles. And that trend continues with the ongoing movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — see the memeification of arresting the cops who killed Breonna Taylor or the widespread use of Karen as a negative term for a privileged and racist white woman.

As the author of the 2019 book Memes to Movements: How the World’s Most Viral Media is Changing Social Protest and Power, Mina can provide context on the ways internet memes are shaping pop culture, politics, protest and propaganda.

Before joining Meedan, Mina was a research fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society and a 2016 Knight Visiting Fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism. She’s the co-author of the upcoming Hanmoji Handbook, which uses emojis to teach Mandarin Chinese, and her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Foreign Policy and Hyperallergenic.

Mina has worked with The Civic Beat and China Residencies to create workshops and art exhibitions in spaces including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Museum of the Moving Image in New York City and the Center for Media at Risk at the University of Pennsylvania.

Credit Jan Chipchase/Studio D Radiodurans (©)

Expertise: Digital creative culture, how memes influence protest movements and politics

Contact information:

Email: anxiaomina-berkman@protonmail.com 

Listen to An Xiao Mina speaking at the Data & Society Research Institute:

Last updated July 14, 2020

Carla Fredericks

Carla Fredericks is the director of the American Indian Law Clinic at the University of Colorado Law School and of the indigenous advocacy organization First Peoples Worldwide. She’s an expert on Native American law, rights and tribal sovereignty.

As part of the broader movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — and after years of resistance — Washington’s NFL team is finally considering a name change following pressure from corporate sponsors like FedEx.

But Fredericks says that’s not the whole story: FedEx did not turn on a dime. Instead, native activists have been pressuring investors and business partners of the NFL team for more than a decade. And the push isn’t over — the Cleveland Indians are also considering a name change, while the Atlanta Braves are not.

Fredericks can provide context on the long campaign by Native activists to change the name of the D.C. team and how Native Americans and the fight for tribal sovereignty fit into the broader movement for racial justice.

Before joining the University of Colorado, Fredericks was a partner at Milberg LLP in New York. She maintains a pro bono practice, and provided legal counsel to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe during and after the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

She’s also published many studies and papers including Social Cost and Material Loss: The Dakota Access Pipeline, which found that backers lost at least $12 billion due to the legal battles and controversy surrounding the project.

Fredericks is an enrolled citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation of North Dakota.

Location: Boulder, CO

Expertise: Native American law, rights and sovereignty

Contact information:

Email: Carla.Fredericks@Colorado.EDU 

Phone: (303) 492-7079

Listen to Carla Fredericks on Colorado Public Radio:

Last updated July 9, 2020

Wilfred Chan

Currently a contributing writer at The Nation, Wilfred Chan previously worked in Hong Kong for CNN International covering the 2014 Umbrella Movement and its aftermath. He can offer insight on the future of protest, free speech and democracy in Hong Kong under the new national security law.

For more than a year, Hong Kong has been protesting. Demonstrations started as a reaction to the since-withdrawn mainland extradition bill, but following a brutal police crackdown the scope quickly expanded to include the current five demands — an investigation into police brutality, the government to stop calling the protests “riots,” amnesty for those arrested and full universal suffrage in the city’s elections.

In response, Beijing bypassed the city’s legislature and directly implemented the new national security law, which effectively makes dissent against the central government a crime. Targeting crimes related to subversion, secession, foreign interference or terrorism, the law is quite expansive in scope — Beijing will set up its own independent police agency in Hong Kong, independent from both judicial review and the city’s legal system, and all cases deemed “serious” will be tried in Chinese courts with Chinese judges. Those convicted can face up to life in prison. And the law’s reach is not just limited to Hong Kong residents — under article 38, it applies to offenses committed by anyone, anywhere in the world.

Despite being implemented for a week, there’s already been a chilling effect with local pro-democracy political parties disbanding, citizens deleting social media profiles and shops removing political posters.

Chan’s most recent piece for The NationThe Infinite Heartbreak of Loving Hong Kong — tackles the despair of watching the city change for the worse. An upcoming article will tackle the impact of the United States on Hong Kong politics, as seen with the 2019 Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and the Trump administration’s late June removal of some of the city’s special privileges.

Chan is a member of Lausan, a transnational collective that shares decolonial left-wing perspectives from Hong Kong writers and activists. His work has also been published in Dissent Magazine, The Guardian, Splinter News and ArtAsiaPacific.

Location: New York City

Expertise: Hong Kong protests and the national security law / pro-democracy movement

Contact information:

Email (preferred): wilfredwchan@gmail.com 

Twitter: @wilfredchan

Listen to Wilfred Chan on KPFA:

Last updated July 6, 2020

Bernard Powers

Dr. Bernard Powers is the founding director of the College of Charleston’s Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston and a professor emeritus of history at the university. He’s an expert on African American history and culture and the role of slavery in American history.

Charleston — the city where the civil war started and where 40% of all enslaved Africans brought to the United States entered the country — has long been a center of African American history and culture. And like many American cities, it also has public Confederate monuments and statues of historical figures who supported slavery and advocated white supremacy.

As of last week, the city has one less monument. The statue of vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun in Marion Square — located just a block from Mother Emanuel AME, the site of the 2015 terrorist attack by white supremacist Dylan Roof — was removed on June 24 after a unanimous city council vote.

In a recent op-ed, Powers advocates for a new monument honoring Civil War-era African Americans — such as Charleston native Robert Smalls — as a replacement for the White Point Gardens Confederate memorial.

Over his 40-year academic career, Powers has published numerous books and articles including 1994’s Black Charlestonians:  A Social History 1822-1885, which examines the socioeconomic history of the city’s vibrant free Black population and the changes caused by emancipation after the Civil War. Most recently, he co-authored the 2016 book We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel.

Powers has also appeared in several documentaries, including the PBS series African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross and 2019’s Emanuel: the Untold Story of the Victims and Survivors of the Charleston Church Shooting. His current research focuses on African Methodism in South Carolina.

Location: Charleston, South Carolina

Expertise: African American history and culture, the role of slavery in American history

Contact information:

Email (preferred): powersb@cofc.edu

Phone: 843-813-4871

Listen to Bernard Powers on South Carolina Public Radio:

Last updated June 29, 2020

Stephen Lockhart

Dr. Stephen Lockhart is the chief medical officer at Sutter Health, where he oversees the quality and safety of the organization’s patient care, as well as research and education. Sutter Health is a nonprofit health care network in California.

Lockhart has more than 30 years of experience in the field, including as a hospital administrator, board-certified anesthesiologist and university professor. He led the development of Sutter’s Health Equity Index, which uses health system data, combined with other information, like demographics, to quantify and predict health outcomes for specific racial or ethnic groups. When the index was launched in 2016, it was used to quantify disparities in patient care for conditions such as asthma and diabetes. 

Previously, Lockhart was the chief administrative officer at the St. Luke’s campus of Sutter Health’s California Pacific Medical Center, located in San Francisco. There, he was involved in the entitlement process for the center’s new hospitals, improving operations and engaging in community outreach.

The National Medical Fellowships awarded him the Distinguished Alumni Award in 2019 for his service in health care and humanitarian work. Lockhart is also the chairman of the nonprofit Parks California, which supports the state’s parks. 

As a Rhodes Scholar, he earned a Master of Philosophy degree in economics from Oxford University, and Doctor of Medicine and Doctor of Philosophy in biostatistics degrees from Cornell University.

Location: Oakland, Calif.

Expertise: Health equity, anesthesiology, biostatistics, herd immunity, hospital pandemic preparedness, patient care and safety 

Contact information:

Angie Sheets

Phone: 916-494-9547

Email: sheetsa@sutterhealth.org

Listen to Stephen Lockhart on Insight with Beth Ruyak on CapRadio:

Last updated: May 25, 2020

Emma Robbins

Emma Robbins is the director of the Navajo Water Project, which provides infrastructure for Navajo families to access running water in New Mexico, Utah and Arizona. The project is a part of the water nonprofit DigDeep.

Native American households face barriers to accessing running water. About 30% of families on the Navajo reservation don’t have running water, according to the project. Robbins joined the project after growing up in an area with a high concentration of water poverty. She is a Diné artist, and uses her work to raise awareness about the need for clean water across all Native American nations. She is also an Aspen Institute Health Communities Fellow. 

Robbins has been interviewed by the magazine Marie Claire about how Navajo women have been on the frontlines fighting COVID-19 and AZCentral on how the nation’s water shortage may exacerbate the virus’ spread.

Emma Robbins headshot

Location: Los Angeles, Calif. 

Expertise: Activism, environmentalism, water access 

Contact info:

Email: press@digdeep.org

Last updated: May 17,2020