Jenny S. Martinez

Jenny S. Martinez teaches international law, international human rights law, constitutional law, and civil procedure at Stanford Law School. She is an expert on international courts and tribunals, international human rights, national security, constitutional law, and the laws of war. Her research focuses on the role of courts and tribunals in advancing and protecting human rights, ranging from her work on the all-but-forgotten 19th-century international tribunals involved in the suppression of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through her work on contemporary institutions like the International Criminal Court and the role of courts in policing human rights abuses in connection with anti-terrorism policies.

Martinez has written extensively on national security law and the constitutional separation of powers. She is the author of The Slave Trade and the Origins of International Human Rights Law and numerous articles in leading academic journals. Her op-eds have been published in The New York Times and Washington Post, and she has been an expert commentator for both print and broadcast media.

Jenny S. Martinez

Associate Dean for Curriculum, Professor of Law, Warren Christopher Professor in the Practice of International Law and Diplomacy at Stanford Law School

Areas of Expertise: Civil Procedure and Litigation, Comparative Law, Constitutional Law, Human Rights, International Law

Location: Stanford, CA

Contact Info:

Email: jmartinez@law.stanford.edu
Phone: 650-725-2749

Heard on NPR Morning Edition: American Tied to Al-Qaida Charged with Treason

Added June 2015

Faiza Patel

Faiza Patel is the co-director of the non-partisan public policy institute the Brennan Center’s Liberty and National Security Program, which seeks to ensure U.S. counterterrorism laws and policies respect human rights norms and fundamental freedoms.

She has testified before Congress opposing police surveillance of Muslims and developed legislation creating an independent Inspector General for the NYPD.

Patel has been a guest on number of television programs, including ABC’s Up Close, Bloomberg TV and Current TV.

Co-Director, Liberty and National Security Program, Brennan Center for Justice

Areas of Expertise: Civil Liberties, Islam in America, Counterterrorism Laws, Law, National Security

Location: New York, NY

Contact Info:

Please contact the Brennan Center’s communications manager, Seth Hoy

Email: seth.hoy@nyu.edu

Phone: (646) 292-8310

Featured on ABC Up Close:

Paul Butler

Paul Butler is a professor in law at Georgetown University Law Center, teaching in the areas of criminal law and race and the law. He served as a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice, where his specialty was public corruption.

Butler is one of the nation’s most frequently consulted scholars on issues of race and criminal justice. He has been featured on 60 Minutes, Nightline, ABC, CBS and NBC, and is a frequent guest on NPR’s Tell Me More.

Butler has published numerous academic articles in journals including the Yale Law Journal and the Harvard Law Review, and is the author of the book, “Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice.”

image

Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice, Civil Rights & Race Relations, Public Corruption

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: paul.butler@law.georgetown.edu, pdb42@law.georgetown.edu
Phone (office): 202.662.9932

Heard on NPR:

Tell Me More: Play Ball: Do Fans Have Amnesia Over Steroid Scandal?

Added April 2014. Last verified January 2021.

Patricia Williams

Patricia Williams is the James L. Dohr professor of law at Columbia University, where she teaches in the areas of contract law, bioethics (particularly issues involving property in bodies and body parts), and civil and human rights (including issues of race, gender, disability and mental health). In 2000 she received a MacArthur Fellowship for her work in law and social justice.

Williams began her law career as a consumer advocate and freelance journalist; she continues to write a monthly column, “Diary of a Mad Law Professor,” for The Nation magazine (and blogs at madlawprofessor.wordpress.com), is a regular contributor to The Guardian newspaper. She is the author of several books, including “The Alchemy of Race and Rights,” “The Rooster’s Egg” and “Seeing a Color-Blind Future: The Paradox of Race.”

Williams has appeared on WNYC’s The Brian Lehrer Show, The Takeaway with John Hockenberry and NPR’s Tell Me More.


James L. Dohr Professor of Law at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Contract Law, Bioethics, Civil and Human Rights (Race, Gender, Disability and Mental Health), Social Justice

Location: Boston, MA and New York City, NY (France and Seattle, WA, during academic breaks)

Contact Information:
Email:
madlawprofessor@aol.com
Phone: (617) 524-3192

You can also contact Williams’ assistant, Nersa Miller
Phone: (212) 854-8385

Heard on NPR: For a full list, click here.

Tell Me More: Will Obama’s Presidency Change Perceptions Among Blacks?

 

Margaret Russell

Margaret Russell is a professor of constitutional law at California’s Santa Clara University, where she has taught for the past twenty-five years. She specializes in constitutional law, civil rights and civil liberties, as well as freedom of speech, racial equality, sexual orientation equality and the Supreme Court. She is affiliated with the University’s Center for Social Justice & Public Service, the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, and the Center for Multicultural Learning. In 1991, she traveled to South Africa with a delegation of legal scholars to provide consultation on constitution-drafting for the post-apartheid transition.

Russell has appeared as a guest on KQED’s The Forum with Michael Krasny. She also spoke to Tell Me More’s Michel Martin following the Supreme Court’s 2013 ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act, saying, “And as attitudes change among everyday people in the population, that will actually mean that they’re not counting on a court to be some royal, hierarchical, moral decision-maker, but rather people are changing their minds.”

Margaret Russell

Professor of Constitutional Law, Santa Clara University

Areas of Expertise: Constitutional Law, Civil Rights, Civil Liberties, Freedom of Speech, Racial Equality, Sexual Orientation Equality, Supreme Court

Location: Santa Clara, CA (in Tanzania on a fellowship 1/14-6/14)
Contact Info:

Email: mrussell@scu.edu
Phone: (408) 554-5234

Heard on KQED: 

The Forum: Affirmative Action Ban Under Scrutiny

Updated February 2021.

Gabriela Rivera

Gabriela Rivera is the Yale Public Interest Fellow with the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties. As an attorney with the ACLU her work focuses on addressing due process violations in immigration detention, discriminatory policing practices, and abuses of local police partnerships with federal immigration enforcement authorities.

Gabriela is one of the lead attorneys on a class action lawsuit filed in federal court in Los Angeles in June 2013, challenging the methods of coercion and pressure that Border Patrol and ICE agents employ to convince Mexican nationals to sign their own expulsion orders.

Prior to the ACLU she worked with the Federal Defenders, the Yale Law School Reentry Clinic and the Criminal Defense Project, where she focused on mitigating collateral consequences and immigration consequences of criminal convictions.


Legal Fellow/Staff Attorney at ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties

Areas of Expertise: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Immigrant Rights, Racial Justice, Police Practices, Criminal Justice, Economic Justice, Immigration Law, International Human Rights Law

Location: San Diego, CA

Contact Information:
Email:
 Grivera@aclusandiego.org
Phone: (619) 398-4495

Rivera speaks about immigration for the ACLU: 

 

Sherrilyn Ifill

Sherrilyn Ifill is a professor of law at the University of Maryland, and a civil rights lawyer who specializes in voting rights and political participation. Ifill is a former assistant counsel at the NAACP Legal Defense & Education Fund, Inc. where she litigated voting rights cases, including Houston Lawyers’ Association vs. Attorney General of Texas, in which the Supreme Court held that judicial elections are covered by the provisions of section 2 of the Voting Rights Act.

Ifill’s 2007 book, On the Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the 21st Century, explores the continuing effects of the last two recorded lynchings in Maryland. Released to critical acclaim, On the Courthouse Lawn was a finalist for the 2008 Hurston/Wright book award for non-fiction. She also writes about judicial independence, judicial selection and the importance of race and gender diversity on our courts.

She is a regular political and election night commentator on both national and local television and radio programs. She has appeared on CNN, NBC Nightly News, ABC World News Tonight and C-Span, and is a regular voice on local and national public radio and a regular contributor to The Root.

Professor of Law at the University of Maryland

Areas of Expertise: Civil Rights, Voting Rights, Judicial Diversity, Judicial Decision-Making

Location: Baltimore, MD

Contact Info: 

Email: sifill@law.umaryland.edu

Phone: (410) 706-8394

Twitter: @Sifill_LDF


Featured on PBS:

News Hour: Is Discrimination History Provision of Voting Rights Act Still Relevant?

Jerry Gonzalez

Jerry Gonzalez is the founder and CEO of the Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials (GALEO) and the GALEO Latino Community Development Fund. Gonzalez has been named one of “Georgia’s 100 Most Influential” by Georgia Trend Magazine. GALEO’s mission is to increase civic engagement and leadership development of the Latino/Hispanic community across Georgia.

Previously Gonzalez worked with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) as a Legislative Policy Analyst, focusing on immigrants’ rights issues at the Georgia General Assembly and across the Southeast. In part through his efforts, DeKalb County became the largest municipality to accept the Mexican Matricula Consular ID card as a form of identification for Mexican nationals in DeKalb County. He also advocated toward the passage of a new Georgia flag without the confederate battle emblem.

During the 2010 Census, Gonzalez advocated for strong participation of the Latino community in Georgia. Gonzalez and GALEO were also involved in fighting the passage of Georgia’s HB 87, an anti-immigration piece of legislation.

image

Founder, Executive Director of Georgia Association of Latino Elected Officials

Areas of Expertise: Latino Issues, Immigration, Politics, Latino Vote, Latino Politics,Leadership Development, Civil Rights, Voting Rights, Gay Rights, Marriage Equality

Location: Atlanta, GA
Contact Info:

Office: (404) 745-2580

Email: jerry@galeo.org
Twitter: @JerryGonzalez93

Featured on FOX5:

Added in June 2013. Last updated January 2021.

Iván Espinoza-Madrigal

Ivan Espinoza-Madrigal is the legal director of the Center for HIV Law and Policy (CHLP), and a civil rights attorney specializing in legal issues affecting the LGBT community and those living with HIV, particularly in immigration law. Most recently, he worked at Lambda Legal, where he focused on marriage equality, immigration and issues affecting LGBT and HIV-affected people of color.

Espinoza-Madrigal’s cases have been featured in the New York Times and New York Law Journal. He speaks nationally on civil rights issues, and provides legal commentary to CNN, Univision, Telemundo and the Huffington Post. The National LGBT Bar Association has recognized him as one of the Best LGBT Lawyers under 40.

Capture66

Legal Director of the Center for HIV Law and Policy

Areas of Expertise: Gay Rights, Public Health, Immigrant Rights, Immigration Reform, Civil Rights, Latino Rights/Issues, Marriage Equality, Issues Affecting LGBT and HIV-Affected People of Color

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: iespinoza@hivlawandpolicy.org

Mobile: (908) 405-2269

Twitter: @ivanEspinozaESQ

Cecillia Wang

Cecillia Wang is the Director of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Immigrants’ Rights Project. Wang first worked with ACLU as a civil rights lawyer on a fellowship at the Immigrant’s Rights Project in 1997-98. She has also served as a trial attorney with the federal public defender office for the Southern District of New York and as an attorney in a San Francisco law firm working on commercial litigation and white collar criminal defense.

Wang has spoken about civil rights and immigration law at Yale, Stanford, Berkeley, and Vanderbilt law schools and has trained attorneys and advocates on civil rights issues. She attended Yale Law School and clerked for both Judge William Norris of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and Justice Harry Blackmun of the Supreme Court of the United States.


Director of the Immigrants’ Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Immigration Law, Immigrant Rights, Civil Rights, Criminal Law

Location: San Francisco, CA (with some travel to New York and Washington, DC)

Contact Information:
Phone: (415) 343-0775

You can also reach out to the Immigrants’ Rights Project Communications Manager, Isabel Alegría:
Email: ialegria@aclu.org
Phone: (415) 343-0785

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

All Things Considered: Appeals Court Defers on Ala., Ga. Immigration Laws