#NPRSource of the Week: Eve Ewing

Eve L. Ewing is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago. Her current research is focused on racism, social inequality, urban policy, and the impact these forces have on American public schools and the lives of young people.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT EVE EWING

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This Week’s #NPRSource: Amelia Tseng

Amelia Tseng is a research associate at the Smithsonian Institute, scholar-in-residence in education at American University, and adjunct lecturer in linguistics and Spanish at Georgetown University. Tseng’s research addresses multilingualism, mobility, and identity.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT AMELIA TSENG

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subscribe to our weekly newsletter here to receive email updates. follow us @sourceoftheweek and #nprsource for more sources! want to recommend an expert? e-mail us at sourceoftheweek@npr.org.

Tina Trujillo

Tina Trujillo is an Associate Professor at the University of California Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education. She is an expert on education inequality, federal educational policymaking, and test-based educational reforms. Trujillo’s research focuses on the politics of urban district reform and the effects of standardized testing. The American Educational Research Journal and Teachers College Record are among the numerous journals that have published her work. She can be heard contributing her expertise on NPR’s Morning Edition, here.

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Associate Professor at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education 

Area of Expertise: Educational Inequality, Federal Education Policymaking, Test-Based Educational Reforms and High-Stakes Testing

Location: Berkeley, CA

Contact Information:

Email: trujillo@berkeley.edu

Phone: (510) 642- 6272

[cell] (510) 517-0874;

[fax] (510) 642-4803

Twitter: @TinaTrujillo10

Heard on NPR’s Morning Edition: California Brings Gay History Into The Classroom 

Source(s) of the Week: Michelle Asha Cooper and Patricia Gándara

We’re still with the Education Team this week with Elissa Nadworny guest editing, and she’s handpicked some pretty great and versatile sources!

Michelle Asha Cooper

“However, the more systemic instances of racism that permeate higher education are rarely acknowledged. Our failure, for example, to really talk about race manifests in a growing trend among higher education professionals and advocates, like myself, to use the more mainstream term of “equity.” While race is often implicit in these conversations, “equity” is quickly becoming a catchall phrase that could easily, once again, marginalize the issue of race.

Equity does prompt attention to a range of marginalized populations based on markers such as socioeconomic status, gender, etc. – important lenses for addressing discrimination – but discrete attention to race is often lost in the process. I also recognize that the term equity is more palatable; after all, initiating a conversation by talking about race is often a nonstarter. But just because we are uncomfortable with the word, or more specifically, uncomfortable with our country’s racial past and its lingering effects, does not mean that the blemish is not there. To the contrary, our discomfort allows these wounds to deepen.”

Michelle Asha Cooper, in an essay for Inside Higher Ed, “Ending Racism Is Still a Civil Rights Issue”

Patricia Gandara

“The straw that breaks the camel’s back is when economically this really comes home to folks in these states that are on the edge of decline right now as a result of failing to educate this population. So you look at California and Texas—two states in which half or more of their K-12 population is Latino. And there have been studies done that look at what the consequences of that are economically for the state… Well, California right now can’t close its budget gaps. That’s not all because of Latino kids. But it’s a piece of it. We’re not generating enough income because we’re not generating the kind of educational product that we need. So my hope is that people begin to connect the dots and realize this is affecting each of us because the state is not going to be able to sustain itself.”

Patricia Gándara, discussing the Latino achievement gap in an interview with the Hechinger Report

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Source(s) of the Week: Khaliah Barnes and Dana Thompson Dorsey

We’re making a smooth transition from politics to the Education Team this week, and our guest editor is the Elissa Nadworny:

Khaliah Barnes

“Rampant data collection is not only destroying student privacy, it also threatens students’ intellectual freedom. When schools record and analyze students’ every move and recorded thought, they chill expression and speech, stifling innovation and creativity.”

Khaliah Barnes, Associate Director of Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), in an op-ed to the New York Times

Dana Thompson Dorsey

“Students today are more racially segregated today than they were in the late 1960s prior to the enforcement of court-ordered desegregation in school districts across the country… We have to educate parents, and it has to be on a regular basis, when parents are not just learning about what their kids are learning in the school, but what the political process is and where their voice fits.”

Dana Thompson Dorsey, on the outcome of Brown v. Board of Education

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Source(s) this week: Mo Elleithee and Maite Arce

We’re with the Washington Desk again this week, edited by Domenico Montanaro. He chose two experts to feature:

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Mo Elleithee, Founding Executive Director of Georgetown University’s Institute of Politics and Public Service

If you’d like an expert who can comment on WHY politicians are saying WHAT they’re saying, Elleithee’s the person to talk to.

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Maite Arce, Founder and President/CEO of Hispanic Access Foundation

The Hispanic Access Foundation (HAF) strives to improve the quality of life of Latinos in the U.S. through community & faith leaders, local service providers and information. Arce has talked to news outlets about their work with organizing the Latino community in environmental causes.

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Caroline Hoxby, Professor of Economics at Stanford University

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“I think the most important thing is for families to start a little bit early. If you have a 16-year-old or a 17-year-old, start now. If you are a senior and you still have not figured out how you’re going to pay for college, it is not too late to start. First, think about the colleges for which you’d be well-suited without reference to cost, and then with your list of colleges, go online and go to those colleges’ net cost calculators.

Figure out how much it would cost you. Ignore all of the information that you may hear from your neighbors and your friends about how much they think college costs or something that you hear that’s alarmist. Go and figure out how much it’s going to cost you and focus on that.”

Caroline Hoxby speaking to NPR’s Michel Martin on How to Pay for College

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