Tony Reames

Dr. Tony G. Reames is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability where he directs the Urban Energy Justice Lab. He’s an expert in energy justice and can provide insight into the racial and economic disparities surrounding access to energy in the United States and how those disparities interface with climate change.

At the Urban Energy Justice Lab, Reames researches fair and equitable access to clean and affordable energy and seeks to understand the production and persistence of spatial, racial, and socioeconomic residential energy disparities. In 2019, he was named to the Grist 50 Fixers list.

Reames has a PhD in public administration from the University of Kansas, a Masters in engineering management from Kansas State University, and a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. 

Reames is also a licensed professional engineer and veteran U.S. Army officer — he served for eight years, reaching the rank of Captain.

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Expertise Field: Energy justice, climate and energy, urban energy, sustainability, civil engineering

Contact information:

Email: treames@umich.edu 

Phone: 734-647-3916

Twitter: @tgreames

Listen to Tony Reames on WEMU:

Last updated September 17, 2020

Ernesto Alvarado

Dr. Ernesto Alvarado is a research associate professor of wildland fire sciences in the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences at the University of Washington. He’s an expert on fire ecology and management and can provide insight on the role climate change plays in wildfires and what we should do to better manage forests.

Alvarado’s research focuses on forests in Alaska and the western and southeast United States, in addition to his international work in Brazil, Mexico and Bolivia. 

Topics of study include fire behavior, biomass assessment, combustion modeling, fire ecology, fire management, prescribed fire, fires and climate change, landscape ecology, smoke emissions, and the impacts of smoke on public health.

He’s also looked into traditional fire use and forest management by indigenous communities

At the University of Washington, Alvarado teaches courses on wildland fire management, fire ecology, and the role of culture and place in natural resource stewardship in the Yakama Nation. He also leads graduate seminars on forest dynamics and disturbances and traditional ecological knowledge and fire use. 

Alvarado is also a member of the Fire and Environmental Research Applications Research Team of the U.S. Forest Service Pacific Wildland Fire Sciences Laboratory in Seattle.

Location: Seattle, WA

Expertise Field: Forest fire ecology, wildfires, fire management, prescribed fire, smoke emissions, climate change, forestry

Contact information:

Email: alvarado@uw.edu 

Phone: 206-616-6920

Listen to Ernesto Alvarado on KING5 Seattle:

Last updated August 27, 2020

Alannah Hurley

Alannah Hurley has worked extensively in community development and environmental justice and is dedicated to helping make self-determination a reality for Alaska’s indigenous people.

She is the executive director of United Tribes of Bristol Bay, a tribally chartered consortium of 15 federally recognized tribes opposed to the Pebble Mine in Alaska, and can provide insight on the environmental and Alaska Native opposition to the project.

The proposed mine has long been controversial due to its location in the headwaters of Bristol Bay, home to the world’s largest wild sockeye salmon fishery. Opponents say the massive gold and copper complex will likely pollute the bay and harm the salmon runs.

The Obama administration agreed, and blocked the project, but the Trump administration reversed course — last month’s environmental review said it would pose no major harm.

But the project still faces bipartisan opposition, including from the President’s son Donald Trump Jr., so it’s unclear if the Army Corps of Engineers will give the final federal go-ahead.

Hurley is Yup’ik, and was born, raised and currently lives in the Bristol Bay Region. She graduated from the University of New Mexico with a B.A. in Native American studies and a minor in political science.

Location: Dillingham, AK

Expertise Field: Alaska Native opposition to the Pebble Mine, environmental conservation and activism

Contact information:

Email: ahurley@utbb.org 

Phone: 907-843-1633 or 907-842-1687

Twitter: @UnitedTribes_BB

Listen to Alannah Hurley testifying at the House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure:

Last updated August 13, 2020

Emma Robbins

Emma Robbins is the director of the Navajo Water Project, which provides infrastructure for Navajo families to access running water in New Mexico, Utah and Arizona. The project is a part of the water nonprofit DigDeep.

Native American households face barriers to accessing running water. About 30% of families on the Navajo reservation don’t have running water, according to the project. Robbins joined the project after growing up in an area with a high concentration of water poverty. She is a Diné artist, and uses her work to raise awareness about the need for clean water across all Native American nations. She is also an Aspen Institute Health Communities Fellow. 

Robbins has been interviewed by the magazine Marie Claire about how Navajo women have been on the frontlines fighting COVID-19 and AZCentral on how the nation’s water shortage may exacerbate the virus’ spread.

Emma Robbins headshot

Location: Los Angeles, Calif. 

Expertise: Activism, environmentalism, water access 

Contact info:

Email: press@digdeep.org

Last updated: May 17,2020

Shalanda Baker

Shalanda Baker is a Professor of Law, Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University. She is an expert on energy and environmental policy.

Baker also found the Energy Justice Program at the William S. Richardson School of Law of the University of Hawai’i. She is also a Fulbright scholar and completed a William H. Hastie Fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

Prior to teaching, she worked as a corporate and project finance associate for the law firm Bingham McCutchen.

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Areas of Expertise: Energy Policy, Environmental Policy, Sustainable Development 

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Contact Info:

Email: s.baker@northeastern.edu

Phone: (617) 373-4070

She can be heard here:

Kiho Kim

Kiho Kim is a professor of Environmental Science at American University. His work focuses on how environmental drivers, such as climate change and nutrient pollution, impact coastal ecosystem health. 

At the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, Kim has examined the origins and spreading of diseases. He has worked with the British Council in promoting international networking for young scientists, and was an advisor to the Coral Disease Working Group of the World Bank.

Kim is a member of the Environmental Literacy Committee of the Office of the State Superintendent of Education, Washington D.C.

He completed two terms as a member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Academies (USA) and as an officer of the International Society for Reef Studies.

Kiho

Areas of Expertise: Environmental Science, Biology, Marine Conservation

Location: Washington D.C.

Contact:

Email: kiho@american.edu

Phone number: (202) 885-2181

He can be heard here: 

Regina Shih

Regina Shih is a Senior Policy Researcher at the RAND Corporation where she leads the Climate Change and Health Group. She conducts research in three primary areas: environmental health, aging, and mental health.

Shih has led environmental health projects to develop a toolkit to improve older adults’ resilience to climate change, to identify chemical exposures following climate change-related storms and flooding, and to estimate the health effects of lead exposure and ambient air pollution. She has been cited in outlets such as NPR, CNN, and US News and World Report.

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Senior Policy Researcher, RAND Corporation

Areas of Expertise: Environmental Health, Climate Change, Dementia, Long-Term Care, Substance Use, Neighborhoods and Health

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email:
media@rand.org

As Heard On Public Radio East: “Sleep Problems Prevalent Among Military”

Christopher Smith

Christopher Smith is the Baker Institute Advisory Board Fellow in Energy Studies at Rice University and previously served as the assistant secretary for fossil energy at the U.S. Department of Energy. During his time at the DOE, Chris oversaw the department’s fossil energy research and development program (coal, oil and natural gas), the National Energy Technology Laboratory, and the natural gas regulatory process.

He writes about carbon markets and energy transitions and how policy can address concerns of local communities adversely affected by shifts in energy-use patterns.

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Baker Institute Advisory Board Fellow in Energy Studies, Rice University
Managing Partner, Paladin Equity, LLC.

Areas of Expertise: Energy Studies, Fossil Energy, Coal, Natural Gas, Energy Use, Energy Policy

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: chris.smith0226@gmail.com
Phone: (202) 320-6659

Heard on: The Aaron Harber Show

Anita Chandra

Anita Chandra is the director of the Justice, Infrastructure, and Environment program at the RAND Corporation. Her research focuses on long-term disaster recovery, community resilience, and urban planning. Chandra’s recent publications have focused on the private sector’s role in emergency preparedness and disaster response.

Chandra has been cited by a number of outlets, including NBC, PBS, and the Washington Post. Prior to her position as JIE director, she served as director of RAND’s Behavioral and Policy Sciences Department. She earned a Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

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Director of the Justice, Infrastructure, and Environment program, RAND Corporation

Areas of Expertise: Community Resilience, Emergency Preparedness, Disaster Recovery, Urban Planning, Mental Health and Illness, Military Families, Childhood Development, Community-based Health Care

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: media@rand.org

Heard on NPR’s Tell Me More: Military Families Cope With The Stress Of War

 

Maxine Burkett

Maxine Burkett is a professor of law at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa and fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. She is also the co-founder and senior advisor to the nonprofit Institute for Climate and Peace.

Burkett is an expert in the law and policy of climate change, with a specific focus on climate justice, climate litigation, climate-induced migration, and climate change, peace, and conflict.  At the Wilson Center, Burkett works with the Environmental Change and Security Program on climate impacts in frontline communities, including small island states, and climate change and foreign policy.

Her work has been cited in several news and policy outlets, including BBC Radio, the New York Times, the Washington Post and Nature Climate Change.

She serves on the boards of Blue Planet Foundation, The Climate Museum, ELAW, and Global Greengrants Fund. Burkett is also a member scholar of the Center for Progressive Reform, the Lancet Commission for Reparations and Redistributive Justice, and the American Law Institute.

Hi-res

Areas of Expertise: Climate policy and law, climate-induced migration

Location: Honolulu, HI

Contact Information:
E-mail: burkettm@hawaii.edu
Phone: (808) 956-2865 (o) | (808) 478-2146 (c)

Last updated April 10, 2020