#NPRSource of the Week: Jose Miguel Cruz

Jose Miguel Cruz is the Director of Research at Florida International University’s Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center. He is an expert in the area of criminal violence, gangs, police, democratization and public opinion in Latin America. He has written about American scholarship on gangs and the processes through which the maras (MS-13 and MS-18) have evolved

Jose Miguel Cruz

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#NPRSource of the Week: Miguel Tinker Salas

Miguel Tinker Salas is a professor of History and Latin American Studies at Pomona College and is an authority on the political and social issues confronting Latin America. Salas is most recently the author of Venezuela: What Everyone Needs to Know (2015).

His research interests in particular center on Venezuelan politics and culture, and the U.S. presence in Venezuela. He is also interested in Latin American immigration policies and the diaspora. His expertise has been featured in several media outlets, including CNNNPR, and The New York Times.

Miguel Tinker Salas photo

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#NPRSource Of The Week: Suyapa Portillo

Suyapa Portillo Villeda is an assistant professor in Chicana/o Latina/o Transnational Studies at Pitzer College. Her work broadly focuses on social movements in Central America with a focus on Honduras. In particular, Portillo’s research centers on the intersections between labor, gender, and race in workers’ lives in the history of the banana export economy in Honduras and Central America.

Since the coup d’état in Honduras in 2009, Portillo has served as region expert in the media to attest to conditions in Honduras and the rest of Central America. Her expertise has been cited by CNN, NPR’s Take Two, and The Huffington Post.

Suyapa Portillo photo

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#NPRSource of the Week: Elizabeth OuYang

Elizabeth OuYang has been a civil rights attorney and advocate for the past 30 years. She is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights and New York University’s College of Arts and Science. Her areas of expertise include voting, immigration, media accountability, and combating hate crimes and police brutality.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ELIZABETH OUYANG

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Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti

Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti is a professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University in New York, NY. She is an expert on how public policy is impacted by gender, race, ethnicity- specifically on how Latino youth are impacted by technology, the military system and immigration policy. Monforti is the former president of the APSA Latino Caucus- an association pushing for the promotion and protection of professional development of Latina/os in political science.  She has contributed to several news articles and broadcasts including NPR’s All Things Considered.

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Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University 

Areas of Expertise: Public Policy Impacts by Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Impacts of Technology, Military System and Immigration Policy on Latino Youth

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: jlavariegamonforti@pace.edu

Phone: 917-724-6769 (cell)

Twitter:@dralavariega 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredIn Texas Borderland, Security Is No Simple Goal

Erika Andiola

Erika Andiola is a well-known immigration activist. She recently joined Bernie Sanders’ campaign as a Latino outreach strategist, focusing on states in the Southwest. Andiola co-founded the Arizona Dream Act Coalition. She’s a former Congressional Staffer for Arizona Congresswoman, Kyrsten Sinema. Her passion for immigrant rights is driven from her own struggle as an undocumented woman. She has appeared on MSNBC and Univision.

Andiola

Immigration rights activist

Areas of expertise: Immigration activism

Location: Bernie Sanders campaign HQ in Burlington, VT

Contact Information:

Emaileandiola@berniesanders.com

Phone: (202) 836-7004

Twitter: @ErikaAndiola 

Featured on MSNBC: Up with Steve Kornacki

Source(s) of the Week: Michelle Asha Cooper and Patricia Gándara

We’re still with the Education Team this week with Elissa Nadworny guest editing, and she’s handpicked some pretty great and versatile sources!

Michelle Asha Cooper

“However, the more systemic instances of racism that permeate higher education are rarely acknowledged. Our failure, for example, to really talk about race manifests in a growing trend among higher education professionals and advocates, like myself, to use the more mainstream term of “equity.” While race is often implicit in these conversations, “equity” is quickly becoming a catchall phrase that could easily, once again, marginalize the issue of race.

Equity does prompt attention to a range of marginalized populations based on markers such as socioeconomic status, gender, etc. – important lenses for addressing discrimination – but discrete attention to race is often lost in the process. I also recognize that the term equity is more palatable; after all, initiating a conversation by talking about race is often a nonstarter. But just because we are uncomfortable with the word, or more specifically, uncomfortable with our country’s racial past and its lingering effects, does not mean that the blemish is not there. To the contrary, our discomfort allows these wounds to deepen.”

Michelle Asha Cooper, in an essay for Inside Higher Ed, “Ending Racism Is Still a Civil Rights Issue”

Patricia Gandara

“The straw that breaks the camel’s back is when economically this really comes home to folks in these states that are on the edge of decline right now as a result of failing to educate this population. So you look at California and Texas—two states in which half or more of their K-12 population is Latino. And there have been studies done that look at what the consequences of that are economically for the state… Well, California right now can’t close its budget gaps. That’s not all because of Latino kids. But it’s a piece of it. We’re not generating enough income because we’re not generating the kind of educational product that we need. So my hope is that people begin to connect the dots and realize this is affecting each of us because the state is not going to be able to sustain itself.”

Patricia Gándara, discussing the Latino achievement gap in an interview with the Hechinger Report

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