#NPRSource of the Week: Elizabeth OuYang

Elizabeth OuYang has been a civil rights attorney and advocate for the past 30 years. She is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights and New York University’s College of Arts and Science. Her areas of expertise include voting, immigration, media accountability, and combating hate crimes and police brutality.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT ELIZABETH OUYANG

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Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti

Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti is a professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University in New York, NY. She is an expert on how public policy is impacted by gender, race, ethnicity- specifically on how Latino youth are impacted by technology, the military system and immigration policy. Monforti is the former president of the APSA Latino Caucus- an association pushing for the promotion and protection of professional development of Latina/os in political science.  She has contributed to several news articles and broadcasts including NPR’s All Things Considered.

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Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University 

Areas of Expertise: Public Policy Impacts by Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Impacts of Technology, Military System and Immigration Policy on Latino Youth

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: jlavariegamonforti@pace.edu

Phone: 917-724-6769 (cell)

Twitter:@dralavariega 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredIn Texas Borderland, Security Is No Simple Goal

Erika Andiola

Erika Andiola is a well-known immigration activist. She recently joined Bernie Sanders’ campaign as a Latino outreach strategist, focusing on states in the Southwest. Andiola co-founded the Arizona Dream Act Coalition. She’s a former Congressional Staffer for Arizona Congresswoman, Kyrsten Sinema. Her passion for immigrant rights is driven from her own struggle as an undocumented woman. She has appeared on MSNBC and Univision.

Andiola

Immigration rights activist

Areas of expertise: Immigration activism

Location: Bernie Sanders campaign HQ in Burlington, VT

Contact Information:

Emaileandiola@berniesanders.com

Phone: (202) 836-7004

Twitter: @ErikaAndiola 

Featured on MSNBC: Up with Steve Kornacki

Source(s) of the Week: Michelle Asha Cooper and Patricia Gándara

We’re still with the Education Team this week with Elissa Nadworny guest editing, and she’s handpicked some pretty great and versatile sources!

Michelle Asha Cooper

“However, the more systemic instances of racism that permeate higher education are rarely acknowledged. Our failure, for example, to really talk about race manifests in a growing trend among higher education professionals and advocates, like myself, to use the more mainstream term of “equity.” While race is often implicit in these conversations, “equity” is quickly becoming a catchall phrase that could easily, once again, marginalize the issue of race.

Equity does prompt attention to a range of marginalized populations based on markers such as socioeconomic status, gender, etc. – important lenses for addressing discrimination – but discrete attention to race is often lost in the process. I also recognize that the term equity is more palatable; after all, initiating a conversation by talking about race is often a nonstarter. But just because we are uncomfortable with the word, or more specifically, uncomfortable with our country’s racial past and its lingering effects, does not mean that the blemish is not there. To the contrary, our discomfort allows these wounds to deepen.”

Michelle Asha Cooper, in an essay for Inside Higher Ed, “Ending Racism Is Still a Civil Rights Issue”

Patricia Gandara

“The straw that breaks the camel’s back is when economically this really comes home to folks in these states that are on the edge of decline right now as a result of failing to educate this population. So you look at California and Texas—two states in which half or more of their K-12 population is Latino. And there have been studies done that look at what the consequences of that are economically for the state… Well, California right now can’t close its budget gaps. That’s not all because of Latino kids. But it’s a piece of it. We’re not generating enough income because we’re not generating the kind of educational product that we need. So my hope is that people begin to connect the dots and realize this is affecting each of us because the state is not going to be able to sustain itself.”

Patricia Gándara, discussing the Latino achievement gap in an interview with the Hechinger Report

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This week’s source(s): Jayme Simões and Van Tran

Our sources this week were chosen by guest editor Domenico Montanaro of the Washington Desk.

Here’s what he had to say about the sources he handpicked:

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“With ties to Democratic politics, [Jayme Simões] was one of the people who helped lead the rollout of the ACA in New Hampshire and is a good resource not just as a quotable source but also on who else to talk to.”

HOW TO CONTACT JAYME

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“Often the stories we tell are focused on very recent immigrants and the immigration fights on Capitol Hill. But Tran focuses on immigrants who have come to the U.S. in the last 50 years, post-1965, and have largely reshaped American cities.”

HOW TO CONTACT VAN

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Source(s) of the Week: Syreeta McFadden and Laila Lamani

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“To deny ethnic and cultural differences – to say not only “I don’t see race” but that race is a choose-your-own adventure – is to erase the identities of those who cannot choose.”

Syreeta McFadden, in her Guardian US column on Rachel Dolezal and transracial identities

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO CONTACT SYREETA

 

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“…The very idea of Muslims’ ordinariness is subject to debate in this country. By denying their Muslim compatriots the right to be boringly normal, what TV-bashing bigots do is restrict and define for the rest of us what it means to be All-American.”

Laila Lalami, in a Wall Street Journal commentary on the TLC show “All-American Muslim”

LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW TO CONTACT LAILA

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