Wilfred Chan

Currently a contributing writer at The Nation, Wilfred Chan previously worked in Hong Kong for CNN International covering the 2014 Umbrella Movement and its aftermath. He can offer insight on the future of protest, free speech and democracy in Hong Kong under the new national security law.

For more than a year, Hong Kong has been protesting. Demonstrations started as a reaction to the since-withdrawn mainland extradition bill, but following a brutal police crackdown the scope quickly expanded to include the current five demands — an investigation into police brutality, the government to stop calling the protests “riots,” amnesty for those arrested and full universal suffrage in the city’s elections.

In response, Beijing bypassed the city’s legislature and directly implemented the new national security law, which effectively makes dissent against the central government a crime. Targeting crimes related to subversion, secession, foreign interference or terrorism, the law is quite expansive in scope — Beijing will set up its own independent police agency in Hong Kong, independent from both judicial review and the city’s legal system, and all cases deemed “serious” will be tried in Chinese courts with Chinese judges. Those convicted can face up to life in prison. And the law’s reach is not just limited to Hong Kong residents — under article 38, it applies to offenses committed by anyone, anywhere in the world.

Despite being implemented for a week, there’s already been a chilling effect with local pro-democracy political parties disbanding, citizens deleting social media profiles and shops removing political posters.

Chan’s most recent piece for The NationThe Infinite Heartbreak of Loving Hong Kong — tackles the despair of watching the city change for the worse. An upcoming article will tackle the impact of the United States on Hong Kong politics, as seen with the 2019 Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act and the Trump administration’s late June removal of some of the city’s special privileges.

Chan is a member of Lausan, a transnational collective that shares decolonial left-wing perspectives from Hong Kong writers and activists. His work has also been published in Dissent Magazine, The Guardian, Splinter News and ArtAsiaPacific.

Location: New York City

Expertise: Hong Kong protests and the national security law / pro-democracy movement

Contact information:

Email (preferred): wilfredwchan@gmail.com 

Twitter: @wilfredchan

Listen to Wilfred Chan on KPFA:

Last updated July 6, 2020

Una Osili

Una Osili is a professor of philanthropy and economics at Indiana University’s Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. She is also the associate dean of the school’s research and international programs. 

In 2017, Osili testified before the Senate foreign relations committee on the role of philanthropy and remittances in foreign aid. She discussed how philanthropy has increasingly become globalized, and how philanthropic investments have backed research and education sectors in developing countries. 

Osili also oversees:

-Research at Giving USA, an annual report on the state of charitable giving in the nation.

-The Global Philanthropy Indices, which map global charitable giving for more than 79 economies.

She founded Generosity for Life at the philanthropy school, which visualizes and maps the donations of 9,000 households in America. 

Osili has talked philanthropic advising with the New York Times, declining charitable donations with Marketplace, and nonprofit giving after natural disasters with Fast Company

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Areas of expertise: International and national philanthropy, tax policy and charitable giving, national and global economics, immigrant remittances, crowdfunding, diversity 

Location: Indianapolis, Indiana 

Contact Information: 

Phone: 317-716-7892

Email: uosili@iupui.edu

IU press contact: Adriene Davis Kalugyer

adrldavi@iupui.edu, 317-278-8972 (o), 317-459-7041 (c)

Twitter: @UOsili

Listen to Una Osili on NPR Weekend Edition Sunday

 

Last updated: Feb. 24, 2020

Holly Dagres

Holly Dagres is a nonresident fellow with the Middle East Security Initiative at the Atlantic Council’s Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security. She is an expert on US-Iran relations, Iran’s nuclear program, Iranian culture and society, as well as the Iranian diaspora.

Dagres is the editor of the Scowcroft Center’s Iran Source blog and curator for the weekly newsletter, The Iranist. Before joining the Atlantic Council, Dagres worked as a freelance Iran analyst, regularly following traditional and social media in English and Persian.

She also worked as the assistant editor at the Cairo Review of Global Affairs, associated with the American University in Cairo’s Global Affairs and Public Policy School.

Holly Dagres

Areas of Expertise: US-Iran relations, Iran’s nuclear program, Iranian culture and society, Iranian diaspora

Location: Jerusalem

Contact Information: 

     Email: hdagres@atlanticcouncil.org

     Twitter: @hdagres

She can be heard here:

Daniel Abebe

Daniel Abebe is the Vice Provost and a Professor of Law at The University of Chicago School of Law. He is an expert on constitutional law, foreign affairs, human rights law, international institutions, and the way political and social institutions interact.

Abebe’s research has been published in the University of Chicago Law Review, the Supreme Court Review, and the Virginia Journal of International Law. 

His current research projects include examining the President’s authority to withdraw the US from a treaty; evaluating ethnic federalism as a form of constitutional design; and considering the impact of dejudicialization in international politics.

Abebe, Daniel

Areas of Expertise: Constitutional law, foreign affairs, human rights law, international institutions

Location: Chicago, Illinois

Contact Info:

       Email:  dabebe@uchicago.edu

He can be heard here:

Mieke Eoyang

Mieke Eoyang is the Vice President for the National Security Program at Third Way (a centrist think tank) and a former professional staff member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. At the Third Way, she runs a team that works on every major national security issue, from the details of military personnel policy to the legal framework for going to war. Eoyang is especially interested in intelligence oversight, electronic surveillance reform, and partisan perception on national security. Her writing and analysis has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, POLITICO, Associated Press, The Washington Post, Roll Call, and Forbes.

Mieke Eoyang

VP of National Security Program, Third Way

Areas of Expertise: National Security, Intelligence, Surveillance Laws, Military Policy, Defense Policy, Public Opinion on National Security, Congressional Oversight

Location: Washington, D.C.

Contact Info

Email: MEoyang@Thirdway.org

 

As heard on C-Span: 

Gita Gopinath

Gita Gopinath is a Professor of International Studies and Economics at Harvard University, and has been named one of the top 25 economists under 45 by the International Monetary Fund. Her expertise is in International Finance and Macroeconomics. Gopinath is co-director of the International Finance and Macroeconomics program at the National Bureau of Economic Research, a visiting scholar at the Federal Reserve bank of Boston,  member of the economic advisory panel of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Economic Adviser to the Chief Minister of Kerala state (India), a co-editor at the American Economic Review, co-editor of the current Handbook of International Economics and was managing editor of the Review of Economic Studies.

Gita Gopinath

Professor, Economics and International Finance

Areas of Expertise: Economics, Economic Policy, International Finance, Pricing and Inflation, Currency Exchange

Location: Cambridge, Massachusetts

Contact Info

Email: gopinath@harvard.edu and copy her assistant cgomez@fas.harvard.edu

Phone: (781) 325-2025

 

As heard on NDTV:

José Miguel Cruz

José Miguel Cruz is the Director of Research at Florida International University’s Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center. He is an expert in the area of criminal violence, gangs, police, democratization and public opinion in Latin America. He has written about American scholarship on gangs and the processes through which the maras (MS-13 and MS-18) have evolved.

Jose Miguel Cruz

Director of Research, Florida International University’s Latin American and Caribbean Center

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Violence, Gangs, Police, Democratization and Public Opinion in Latin America

Location: Miami, FL

Contact Info:

Email: jomcruz@fiu.edu

Phone: (615) 945-7487

Heard on C-Span:

Miguel Tinker Salas

Miguel Tinker Salas is a professor of History and Latin American Studies at Pomona College and is an authority on the political and social issues confronting Latin America. Salas is most recently the author of Venezuela: What Everyone Needs to Know (2015).

His research interests in particular center on Venezuelan politics and culture, and the U.S. presence in Venezuela. He is also interested in Latin American immigration policies and the diaspora. His expertise has been featured in several media outlets, including CNN, NPR, and The New York Times.

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Professor of Latin American Studies, Pomona College

Areas of Expertise: Contemporary Venezuelan Politics and Culture, U.S. Presence in Venezuela, Contemporary Mexican Society and Politics, Latin American History, Latin American Immigration Policies and the Latin American Diaspora

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Contact Information:
Email: mtinkersalas@pomona.edu
Phone: (909) 374-7847

As Heard On TRT World: “Venezuela On The Edge: Interview with Miguel Tinker Salas”

David C. Kang

David C. Kang is a professor of International Relations and Business at the University of Southern California. He is also the director of both the USC Korean Studies Institute and the USC Center for International Studies. Kang is broadly interested in the international relations of Asia, with his research exploring questions of economic development, security relations in the region, and the historical basis of contemporary relations. His latest book is American Grand Strategy and East Asian Security in the 21st Century (Cambridge, 2017).

Kang is a regular consultant for U.S. government agencies and the military for his regional expertise. He has also written opinion pieces in several publications, including the New York Times and the Washington Post, and he has appeared regularly in media such as CNN, WNYC, and NPR.

David C Kang photo

Professor of International Relations and Business, University of Southern California 

Areas of Expertise: International Relations of Asia, Economic Development, Security Relations of Asia, North Korea

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Contact Information:
Email: kangdc@usc.edu

You can also contact Kang’s assistant, Sarah Shear.
Phone: (213) 740-4059

As Heard On PBS News Hour: “Will South Korea’s new president change course with North Korea, U.S.?”

Rashid Khalidi

Rashid Khalidi is a professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University. His research has focused on the history and political situation of the Middle East, with a particular focus on Palestine and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Previously, he served as an advisor to the Palestinian delegation to the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations from October 1991 to June 1993. He is most recently the author of Brokers of Deceit: How the U.S. has Undermined Peace in the Middle East [2013].

Khalidi has written on Middle Eastern history and politics in opinion pieces for several publications, including The New York Times, The Guardian, and The Nation. He has been interviewed by numerous radio and TV programs, including All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation, and CNN.

Rashid Khalidi photo

Edward Said Professor of Modern Arab Studies, Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Modern Middle Eastern History, Palestine, Israel, U.S. and the Middle East

Location: New York City, NY

Contact Information:
Email: rik2101@columbia.edu
Phone: (212) 854-5291

As Heard On NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday: “Reframing the Argument: Brokering Middle East Peace”