Bernard Powers

Dr. Bernard Powers is the founding director of the College of Charleston’s Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston and a professor emeritus of history at the university. He’s an expert on African American history and culture and the role of slavery in American history.

Charleston — the city where the civil war started and where 40% of all enslaved Africans brought to the United States entered the country — has long been a center of African American history and culture. And like many American cities, it also has public Confederate monuments and statues of historical figures who supported slavery and advocated white supremacy.

As of last week, the city has one less monument. The statue of vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun in Marion Square — located just a block from Mother Emanuel AME, the site of the 2015 terrorist attack by white supremacist Dylan Roof — was removed on June 24 after a unanimous city council vote.

In a recent op-ed, Powers advocates for a new monument honoring Civil War-era African Americans — such as Charleston native Robert Smalls — as a replacement for the White Point Gardens Confederate memorial.

Over his 40-year academic career, Powers has published numerous books and articles including 1994’s Black Charlestonians:  A Social History 1822-1885, which examines the socioeconomic history of the city’s vibrant free Black population and the changes caused by emancipation after the Civil War. Most recently, he co-authored the 2016 book We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel.

Powers has also appeared in several documentaries, including the PBS series African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross and 2019’s Emanuel: the Untold Story of the Victims and Survivors of the Charleston Church Shooting. His current research focuses on African Methodism in South Carolina.

Location: Charleston, South Carolina

Expertise: African American history and culture, the role of slavery in American history

Contact information:

Email (preferred): powersb@cofc.edu

Phone: 843-813-4871

Listen to Bernard Powers on South Carolina Public Radio:

Last updated June 29, 2020

Miesha Marzell

Miesha Marzell is an Assistant Professor at Binghamton University. She is an expert on the causes and prevention of substance abuse among racial/ethnic minority youth.

Marzell was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center. Subsequently, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health.

marzell

Areas of Expertise: Substance use, racial/ethnic minorities, athletes, mental health

Location: Binghamton, NY

Contact Info:

     Email: mmarzell@binghamton.edu

     Phone: (607) 777-9160

She can be heard here:

Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is the William S. Tod professor of religion and African American studies and chair of the department of African American studies at Princeton University. He currently also serves as the president of the American Academy of Religion. In addition to this, he is a published author whose most well-known books include ‘Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul’ and ‘In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America’.

In 2015, Glaude was awarded an honorary doctorate from Colgate University. He is a columnist for Time magazine and regularly provides commentary on radio and television news programs.

He is currently working on a book about James Baldwin, of whom he writes, “Baldwin’s writing does not bear witness to the glory of America. It reveals the country’s sins, and the illusion of innocence that blinds us to the reality of others.“

William S. Tod professor of Religion and African American studies and Chair of the Department of African Studies at Princeton University

Location: New Jersey/ St.Thomas

Areas of Expertise: Religion, Ethics, Politics, Religion in the Americas, African American Studies

Contact Information:

E-mail: esglaude@princeton.edu
Phone: (609) 258-1319 or contact Dionne Worthy: (609) 258-8159
Twitter: @esglaude

Leah Wright Rigueur

Leah Wright Rigueur is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is an expert on race and politics, modern African American history, U.S. political and social history, and riots, backlash and campus unrest. Rigueur has explored the dynamics of black Republican activists, officials and politicians as it relates to civil rights and conservatism in her latest book  The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power.  She has been featured on various news outlets including NPR’s All Things Considered.

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Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government 

 Areas of expertise: Race and Politics, Modern African American History, U.S. Political and Social History, and Riots, Backlash and Campus Unrest

Location: Cambridge, MA

Contact Information:

Email:  Leah_WrightRigueur@hks.harvard.edulwrightphd@gmail.com

Phone: 617-495-1462

Twitter: @LeahRigueur 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredAt Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti

Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Monforti is a professor and chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University in New York, NY. She is an expert on how public policy is impacted by gender, race, ethnicity- specifically on how Latino youth are impacted by technology, the military system and immigration policy. Monforti is the former president of the APSA Latino Caucus- an association pushing for the promotion and protection of professional development of Latina/os in political science.  She has contributed to several news articles and broadcasts including NPR’s All Things Considered.

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Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Pace University 

Areas of Expertise: Public Policy Impacts by Gender, Race, Ethnicity, and Impacts of Technology, Military System and Immigration Policy on Latino Youth

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: jlavariegamonforti@pace.edu

Phone: 917-724-6769 (cell)

Twitter:@dralavariega 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredIn Texas Borderland, Security Is No Simple Goal

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is an expert on criminal justice, mass incarceration, police brutality, criminal defense racism and criminal courts. Van Cleve focuses her research on the cultural impact of mass incarceration and the racial injustice within criminal courts. Her new book, Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court  “reveals the paradoxes and pain of our modern legal culture, including the effects on the punished and punishers” according to  Henry Louis Gates. She has provided legal commentary on several news networks including MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show, discussing cultural problems with Chicago police, seen here.

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice, Mass Incarceration, Police Brutality, Criminal Defense Racism, Criminal Courts and Criminal Court Reform

Location: Philadelphia, PA

Contact Information:

Email: nvancleve@temple.edu 

Publicist info (Emi Battaglia):

ebpr@yahoo.com 

914-584-8297

Twitter:@nvancleve

Heard on MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show

 

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw is a professor at Columbia Law School and UCLA Law School. Her work focuses on racial and social justice and gender equality. Intersectionality and Critical Race Theory are academic disciplines that have emerged from her work. Crenshaw is also the Executive Director and Co Founder of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School. She has been instrumental in international organizational events such as the United Nations’ World Conference on Racism and the conference for Expert Group on Gender and Race Discrimination. She has also been an influential voice in racial justice campaigns such as “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women” and “Black Girls Matter”. Crenshaw’s articles can be found in Ms.Magazine, Harvard Law Review, National Black Law Journal, Southern California Law Review and has appeared on MSNBC, NPR and “The Tavis Smiley Show”.
The American Bar Foundation named Crenshaw the 2016 Fellows Outstanding Scholar.

Kimberle Crenshaw
Kimberle Crenshaw

Professor of Law at Columbia and UCLA

Areas of Expertise: gender equality, race, social and racial justice, affirmative action, violence against women. structural racial inequality

Location: New York and Los Angeles

Contact Info
Email: crenshaw@law.columbia.edu
Twitter: @sandylocks

 

Heard on NPR’s Morning Edition: The Promise of Diversity Is Yet To Be Fulfilled 

Alexes Harris

Dr. Alexes Harris teaches at the University of Washington and serves as an affiliate at the West Coast Poverty Center and Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology. A driving aim of her work is to produce empirically based research that is theoretically informed, and has real world policy implications for addressing social problems and inequality in the United States. Her most current research examines the sentencing of monetary sanctions, such as fines, fees, and surcharges, to people convicted of felony offenses in Washington state. Using a mixed-method approach, she has analyzed Administrative Office of the Courts data, conducted observations of sentencing and sanctioning hearings, and conducted interviews with court officials to examine variation in sentencing, supervision and sanctioning practices related to unpaid debt.

Harris’ work has been published in a number of academic journals, including The American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Law and Society Review and Symbolic Interaction. With a recently awarded grant, Harris is continuing her research on monetary sanctions to replicate and expand her Washington study in seven other states with collaborators. Harris has testified before the Washington State legislature and Washington State Supreme Court about racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system and sentencing practices. She was recently appointed by United States Attorney General to a four‐year appointment on the Office of Justice Programs Science Advisory Board.

Alexes Harris

Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice Processing and Sentencing of Monetary Sanctions, Race and Ethnicity In The United States

Location: Seattle, WA

Contact Information:

Email: yharris@uw.edu
Website: Alexesharris.com

Heard on NPR Morning Edition: Ferguson’s Plan To Cut Back On Court Fees Could Inspire Change

Added August 2015

Last Verified: August 2015

Dana Thompson Dorsey

Dana Thompson Dorsey teaches courses on education law, policy, and race and culture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Her research interests include education law and policy, educational equity, access, diversity, school reform and Critical Race Theory. She focuses on critically examining school laws, policies and practices, and how they shape educational equality, equity, access and/or opportunity for students of color and other marginalized groups in urban and rural educational contexts.  Currently, Thompson Dorsey’s research concentrates on school segregation and affirmative action, and the legal, policy, and practical implications related to the aforementioned topics.

Thompson Dorsey is a member of the American Educational Research Association, Education Law Association, and she is a licensed attorney in the state of Pennsylvania.

Dana Thompson Dorsey

Assistant Professor in Educational Leadership and Policy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Areas of Expertise: Education Law, Education Policy (related to Racial, Economic and Geographic Segregation and Affirmative Action), School Reform, Educational Equity and Access, Critical Race Theory

Location: Chapel Hill, NC

Contact Information:

Phone: (412) 897-0078
Email: dtdorsey@unc.edu

Heard on UNC School of Education’s Airwaves: The Broken Promises of Brown

Added July 2015

María Pabón López

María Pabón López brings a range of academic and professional legal experience to her role as Dean and Professor of Law at the Loyola New Orleans College of Law. Prior to joining the college in 2011, Lopez spent ten years at Indiana University’s McKinney School of Law as an assistant, associate and full professor of law and three years as a lecturer at the University of Missouri – Columbia School of Law. That follows a distinguished decade-long professional career working in federal courts, private practices and non-profit organizations in her home of Puerto Rico and throughout the United States.

López is an expert in immigrants’ rights (including the education of immigrant children), immigration law and diversity/multicultural matters in the legal profession. She also focuses her research on issues concerning Latinos, race and the law, and the status of women lawyers. López has published widely and currently serves on the Diversity Committee of the Louisiana State Bar Association and on the board of the Louisiana Supreme Court Historical Society.

Her current research is on women in the law in Louisiana.

Maria Pabon Lopez

Dean and Professor of Law at the Loyola New Orleans College of Law

Areas of Expertise: Immigration Law, Diversity and the Law, Legal Education, Family Law, Trusts and Estates, and Criminal Law

Location: New Orleans, LA

Contact Information:

Shaneil S. Achord, López’s Executive Assistant
Phone: (504) 861-5847
Email: achord@loyno.edu

Heard on Louisiana Talk Show “John Redmann: Power of Attorney”: Women & Minorities as Leaders in the World of Law

Added March 2015