Tony Reames

Dr. Tony G. Reames is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan School for Environment and Sustainability where he directs the Urban Energy Justice Lab. He’s an expert in energy justice and can provide insight into the racial and economic disparities surrounding access to energy in the United States and how those disparities interface with climate change.

At the Urban Energy Justice Lab, Reames researches fair and equitable access to clean and affordable energy and seeks to understand the production and persistence of spatial, racial, and socioeconomic residential energy disparities. In 2019, he was named to the Grist 50 Fixers list.

Reames has a PhD in public administration from the University of Kansas, a Masters in engineering management from Kansas State University, and a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. 

Reames is also a licensed professional engineer and veteran U.S. Army officer — he served for eight years, reaching the rank of Captain.

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Expertise Field: Energy justice, climate and energy, urban energy, sustainability, civil engineering

Contact information:

Email: treames@umich.edu 

Phone: 734-647-3916

Twitter: @tgreames

Listen to Tony Reames on WEMU:

Last updated September 17, 2020

Isabel Araiza

Dr. Isabel Araiza is an associate professor of sociology at Texas A&M Corpus Christi, where she teaches in the Mexican American and women and gender studies programs. She’s an expert on sociology and its intersections with education, social class and inequality. 

Araiza has also spoken up against the university’s plans for in-person classes this fall despite the coronavirus pandemic. Many schools have abandoned plans for in-person instruction this fall due to outbreaks — most notably, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made the rest of the semester entirely online after 130 students tested positive in the first week of classes.

Araiza’s recent research has focused on access to clean water, the political preferences of Latinos, Hispanic serving institutions of higher education in Texas and the community impact of the integration of Corpus Christi Independent School District in the 1970s.

Born and raised in Corpus Christi, Araiza went on to earn her PhD in sociology from Boston College. As a public sociologist actively engaged in her community, Araiza is a founding member of For the Greater Good, a local advocacy organization that pushes for access to clean water and investment in public institutions and infrastructure.

She’s also co-authored several health needs assessments on the community needs and uses of hospitals in the Coastal Bend region of South Texas.

Location: Corpus Christi, TX

Expertise Field: Universities and the coronavirus, sociology, Mexican American studies, women and gender studies, social class, education, inequality 

Contact information:

Email: isabel.araiza@tamucc.edu

Phone (cell): 361-779-3927

Phone (office): 361-825-3936

Listen to Isabel Araiza on KIII:

Last updated August 24, 2020

Christen A. Smith

Dr. Christen A. Smith is an associate professor of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies and the director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She’s an expert on Black liberation and state violence against Black communities in the Americas.

Smith can provide context on the anthropological background of police violence against Black communities. Her recent research examines the lingering and deadly impacts of police violence on Black women, communities and families in the U.S. and Brazil.

Her 2016 book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil explores the ironic relationship between police violence against Black Brazilians in Salvador, Bahia and the celebration and consumption of Black culture, music and art.

Smith is also the founder of Cite Black Women, which promotes the intellectual and academic work of Black women — historically overlooked and undervalued. Through a blog, podcast and social media campaign, the project pushes people to reexamine their blind spots on race and gender and start using and citing the work of Black female sources.

Location: Austin, TX

Expertise: Black liberation, resistance and state violence against Black communities in the Americas

Contact information:

Email: christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @profsassy

Listen to Christen A. Smith on KQED’s World Affairs:

Last updated July 22, 2020

Bernard Powers

Dr. Bernard Powers is the founding director of the College of Charleston’s Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston and a professor emeritus of history at the university. He’s an expert on African American history and culture and the role of slavery in American history.

Charleston — the city where the civil war started and where 40% of all enslaved Africans brought to the United States entered the country — has long been a center of African American history and culture. And like many American cities, it also has public Confederate monuments and statues of historical figures who supported slavery and advocated white supremacy.

As of last week, the city has one less monument. The statue of vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun in Marion Square — located just a block from Mother Emanuel AME, the site of the 2015 terrorist attack by white supremacist Dylan Roof — was removed on June 24 after a unanimous city council vote.

In a recent op-ed, Powers advocates for a new monument honoring Civil War-era African Americans — such as Charleston native Robert Smalls — as a replacement for the White Point Gardens Confederate memorial.

Over his 40-year academic career, Powers has published numerous books and articles including 1994’s Black Charlestonians:  A Social History 1822-1885, which examines the socioeconomic history of the city’s vibrant free Black population and the changes caused by emancipation after the Civil War. Most recently, he co-authored the 2016 book We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel.

Powers has also appeared in several documentaries, including the PBS series African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross and 2019’s Emanuel: the Untold Story of the Victims and Survivors of the Charleston Church Shooting. His current research focuses on African Methodism in South Carolina.

Location: Charleston, South Carolina

Expertise: African American history and culture, the role of slavery in American history

Contact information:

Email (preferred): powersb@cofc.edu

Phone: 843-813-4871

Listen to Bernard Powers on South Carolina Public Radio:

Last updated June 29, 2020

Miesha Marzell

Miesha Marzell is an Assistant Professor at Binghamton University. She is an expert on the causes and prevention of substance abuse among racial/ethnic minority youth.

Marzell was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center. Subsequently, she was an assistant professor in the Department of Community and Behavioral Health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health.

marzell

Areas of Expertise: Substance use, racial/ethnic minorities, athletes, mental health

Location: Binghamton, NY

Contact Info:

     Email: mmarzell@binghamton.edu

     Phone: (607) 777-9160

She can be heard here:

Kristin Henning

Kristin Henning is a Professor of Law and Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative at Georgetown Law. She is an expert on Juvenile Justice, Adolescence and Policing, and Race. 

Henning was previously the Lead Attorney for the Juvenile Unit of the D.C. Public Defender Service and is currently the Director of the Mid-Atlantic Juvenile Defender Center.

She is also President of the Board of Directors for the Center for Children’s Law and Policy, and has served as an expert consultant on juvenile justice to a number of state and federal agencies. 

Henning has represented juveniles in serious cases, supervised and trained new Public Defender Service attorneys, and coordinated and conducted training for court-appointed attorneys representing juveniles. 

Henning closer teaching

Areas of Expertise: Juvenile Justice, Race, Adolescence and Policing, Juvenile Justice Reform

Location: Washington D.C. 

Contact Info:

       Email: hennink@georgetown.edu 

       Phone: (202) 215-5754

       Twitter: @profkrishenning

She can be heard here:

Janelle Jones

Janelle Jones is an Economic Analyst at the Economic Policy Institute. Her research focuses on labor market topics around race, ethnicity, and the economy. She was previously a research associate at the Center for Economic and Policy Research, where she worked on unemployment, job quality, the economics of racial inequality, and unions. Her research has been cited in the New Yorker, The Economist, The Washington Post, and Harper’s.

Janelle JonesEconomic Analyst, Economic Policy Institute 

Areas of Expertise: Economic Policy, Race and Economy, Economic Inequality, Unemployment, Job Quality, Unions

Location: Washington, DC

Contact information: 

Email (preferred): news@epi.org

Phone: (202) 775-8810

 

Heard on WPR: 

Suyapa Portillo Villeda

Suyapa Portillo Villeda is an assistant professor in Chicana/o Latina/o Transnational Studies at Pitzer College. Her work broadly focuses on social movements in Central America with a focus on Honduras. In particular, Portillo’s research centers on the intersections between labor, gender, and race in workers’ lives in the history of the banana export economy in Honduras and Central America.

Since the coup d’état in Honduras in 2009, Portillo has served as region expert in the media to attest to conditions in Honduras and the rest of Central America. Her expertise has been cited by CNN, NPR’s Take Two, and The Huffington Post.

Suyapa Portillo photo
Assistant Professor in Chicana/o-Latina/o Transnational Studies, Pitzer College

Areas of Expertise: Chicana/o Latina/o Transnational Studies, Labor, Gender, Ethnicity, Race, Honduras, Central America, History of Immigration and Migration in Central America, LGBTQ Community in Honduras

Location: Los Angeles, CA | Honduras

Contact Information:
Email: Suyapa_portillo@pitzer.edu
Twitter: @SuyapaPV

As Heard On KPCC’s Take Two: “Young Migrants From Honduras Fleeing Drug and Gang Violence”

Rose Elizondo

Rose Elizondo is a restorative justice expert and advocate for peaceful prison reform. Her work focuses on indigenous peacemaking, community building and finding healing alternatives to the criminal justice system.

Elizondo has worked as a restorative justice organizer in the Northern California region for nearly 15 years. In 2005 she co-founded the San Quentin Prison Restorative Justice Interfaith Roundtable, which is now one of the largest grassroots prison restorative justice initiatives in the United States. As a 2017 Soros Fellow, she plans to continue to work with Navajo community leaders in creating alternatives to the justice system in through the use of cultural traditions and practices.

Elizondo.jpg

2017 Soros Justice Fellow and Prison Reform Advocate

Areas of Expertise: Restorative Justice, Indigenous Peacemaking, Racial Equity and its intersections of Mass Incarceration, Restorative Economics and Food Justice.

Location: Crownpoint, NM and San Francisco, CA

Contact Info:

E-mail: Rose4peacemaking@gmail.com

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Zareena Grewal

Zareena Grewal is an Associate professor of American, Religious, Middle East, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies and Ethnicity, Race, & Migration at Yale University. Her research and teaching interests include political and cultural developments in the Middle East and South Asia, the refugee crisis and the reform of Islam.

Grewal is also a senior fellow with the Center for Global Policy, where she formerly worked as the research director. A published author and filmmaker, her upcoming book, “Is the Quran a Good Book?” examines U.S. citizens’ views of the Quran and how it factors into ideas of islamophobia and tolerance in America. In 2005, her film “By the Dawn’s Early Light: Chris Jackson’s Journey to Islam” was nationally broadcast in the United States and again more recently on ESPN’s Outside the Lines. She is the recipient of a number of writing awards, including, most recently, the Society for Humanistic Anthropology’s Victor Turner Prize for Ethnographic Writing.

Grewal

Associate professor of American, Religious, Middle East, Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies and Ethnicity, Race, & Migration, Yale University

Areas of Expertise: Islam, gender studies, race and ethnicity, religious studies, international film, anthropology, ethnographic writing

Location: New Haven, CT
Contact Information:
E-mail: zareena.grewal@yale.edu
Phone: (917) 974-6142
Twitter: @ZareenaGrewal

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