#NPRSource: Aditi Pai

Aditi Pai is an Associate Professor of Biology at Spelman College. She is an expert on genealogy and evolutionary biology, focusing on sexual selection. Pai piloted Spelman’s Genetic and Genealogy Program, where students track their genes, their history, and their relatedness to other humans in the world. In 2018, she was selected for the year-long Governor’s Teaching Fellowship by the Institute of Higher Education at University of Georgia, Athens.

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CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT ADITI PAI

#NPRSource: Moriba Jah

Moriba Jah is an Associate Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics at The University of Texas at Austin and Director for the Advanced Sciences and Technology Research in Astronautics program. Jah’s research focuses on the convergence of policy, technology, and security related to space traffic management and space situational awareness. He has taught undergraduate and graduate courses at UT Austin related to space and astronautical sciences. Jah has navigated several missions to Mars when he worked at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is a Fellow of the International Association for the Advancement of Space Safety (IAASS), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), as well as an Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA).

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CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT MORIBA JAH

#NPRSource: Ada Monzón

Ada Monzón is the Chief Meteorologist for WIPR-TV, WKAQ 580 am and Noticel. Monzón is the first woman in Puerto Rico to be named a fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Separately, she is the Founder and President of EcoExploratorio: Science Museum of Puerto Rico. Monzón was named 2018 National Weatherperson of the Year by the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes. Monzón is also the recipient of The Department of Commerce Silver Medal and the Joanne Simpson Mentorship Award.

 

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CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT ADA MONZON

#NPRSource of the Week: Chandra Prescod-Weinstein

Chanda Prescod-Weinstein is a postdoctoral Research Associate in theoretical physics at the University of Washington, Seattle. She is a particle physicist/cosmologist driven by a desire to understand the origin of spacetime and the particles that populate it. Prescod-Weinstein gives public talks that range from accessible science to the challenges of making scientific communities more inclusive and more reflective of society at large. She is also interested in feminist philosophies of STEM and society studies. She’s given commentary for the Washington Post, Gizmodo, FiveThirtyEight, and Smithsonian.com, to name a few.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CHANDA PRESCOD-WEINSTEIN

#NPRSource of the Week: Regina Shih

Regina Shih is a Senior Policy Researcher at the RAND Corporation where she leads the Climate Change and Health Group. She conducts research in three primary areas: environmental health, aging, and mental health.

Shih has led environmental health projects to develop a toolkit to improve older adults’ resilience to climate change, to identify chemical exposures following climate change-related storms and flooding, and to estimate the health effects of lead exposure and ambient air pollution. She has been cited in outlets such as NPRCNN, and US News and World Report.

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CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT REGINA SHIH

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Mariel Vazquez

Mariel Vazquez is a professor of Microbiology, Mathematics, and Molecular Genetics at the University of California, Davis. She is an expert on the topology of DNA–  how DNA strands are looped and knotted. She uses mathematical tools to understand it’s tangled structure. Vazquez is the 2012 recipient of the U.S. Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) and has served on the Advisory Board at the National Institute of Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS). She has a passion for simplifying the complex nature of DNA to understandable concepts as demonstrated in this video from Numberphile.

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Professor of Microbiology, Mathematics, and Molecular Genetics at the University of California, Davis. 

Areas of expertise: Topology of DNA

Location: Davis, CA

Contact Information:

Phone: (415) 205- 7096 (cell)

Email: mariel@math.ucdavis.edu 

Heard on ‘The Shape of DNA- Numberphile’

Source(s) This Week: Dr. Henri Ford and Dr. Purna Kashyap

We’re still hanging out with NPR’s Science Desk this week, and our sources were recommended by Michaeleen Doucleff. Here’s what she said about these experts:

Henri Ford

“Pediatric surgeon and Harvard grad Dr. Henri Ford is chief of surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. And he’s a great source on neonatal surgery, medical education, inequalities in the U.S. healthcare system and global surgery.

After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Ford returned to where he grew up – Port-au-Prince – and literally hit the streets looking for the wounded. When Ford returned to the U.S., he gave up a lucrative offer in Pittsburgh to take his current post in East Los Angeles. Why? He wanted patient diversity. A friend of mine, who worked under Dr. Ford, summed why he should be on the air: “Dr. Ford has a powerful, charismatic voice and his message is from the heart.”

Purna Kashyap

Dr. Purna Kashyap, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is a fantastic source for discussing the health implications of the microbiome and for diseases connected to the gut and diet, such as diabetes, IBD, celiac disease and food allergies.

What impresses me the most about Dr. Kashyap is his honesty – even when it comes to discussing taboo topics. Last summer I talked to him about the science behind … well, flatulence … and he explained how it’s actually a sign of a healthy microbiome. “A healthy individual can have up to 18 flatulences per day and be perfectly normal,“ he said. “Eating foods that cause gas is the only way for the microbes in the gut to get nutrients.”

Want more experts? Follow us @SourceOfTheWeek and #NPRSource for updates. Want to recommend experts? Email us at sourceoftheweek@npr.org!