Arun Sundararajan

Arun Sundararajan serves as Professor and the Robert L. and Dale Atkins Rosen Faculty Fellow at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He is also an affiliated faculty member at NYU’s Center for Urban Science+Progress, and at NYU’s Center for Data Science.

Sundararajan’s research program studies how digital technologies transform business and society. His current research focuses on crowd-based capitalism, which he believes will evolve into a dominant model of organizing economic activity in the 21st century, altering how we consume, what it means to have a job, the nature of regulation, and the basis for trust in society. Sundararajan has provided expert input about the digital economy as part of Congressional testimony and to a variety of city, state and federal government agencies. Hisop-eds and expert commentary have appeared in print publications like the New Yorker, the New York Times and Harvard Business Review, as well as a variety of radio shows and TV programs.

Arun Sundararajan

Professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences at New York University

Areas of Expertise: All Things Digital, The Sharing Economy, The Future Of Work, Tech In Emerging Markets, and Online Privacy

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: digitalarun@nyu.edu
Twitter: @digitalarun

Heard on NPR’s All Tech Considered: Apps That Share, Or Scalp, Public Parking Spots

Erika Andiola

Erika Andiola is a well-known immigration activist. She recently joined Bernie Sanders’ campaign as a Latino outreach strategist, focusing on states in the Southwest. Andiola co-founded the Arizona Dream Act Coalition. She’s a former Congressional Staffer for Arizona Congresswoman, Kyrsten Sinema. Her passion for immigrant rights is driven from her own struggle as an undocumented woman. She has appeared on MSNBC and Univision.

Andiola

Immigration rights activist

Areas of expertise: Immigration activism

Location: Bernie Sanders campaign HQ in Burlington, VT

Contact Information:

Emaileandiola@berniesanders.com

Phone: (202) 836-7004

Twitter: @ErikaAndiola 

Featured on MSNBC: Up with Steve Kornacki

Amy Liu

Amy Liu serves as vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution. She is a national expert on cities and metropolitan areas adept at translating research and insights into action on the ground.

As senior fellow and co-director of the Metro Program, which Liu co-founded in 1996, she pioneered the program’s signature approach to policy and practice, which uses rigorous research to inform strategies for economic growth and opportunity. Liu has worked directly on such strategies with scores of public and private sector leaders in regions around the country, including Chicago, Kansas City, and Phoenix.

Liu also has extensive experience working with states and the federal government to develop policies and strategies to support cities and metropolitan areas. She co-authored “Delivering the Next Economy: The States Step Up,” outlining a model for states to support bottom-up regional innovation and put this into practice when she worked with New York Governor Andrew Cuomo and other state leaders to develop the New York Regional Economic Development Councils process, a pioneering model for regionalizing state economic development and incentivizing bottom-up innovation.

At the federal level, in 2013 Liu served as a special advisor to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce, guiding policy priorities related to trade, innovation, and data.

Liu
Amy Liu, co-founder of of the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012 in Washington. (Sharon Farmer/sfphotoworks)

Vice President and Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings Institution

Areas of Expertise: Economic Development, Exports and Trade, State and Metropolitan Policies, Social Equity, Post-Disaster Recovery

Contact Information:

Email: aliu@brookings.edu
Twitter: @amy_liuw
Media contact: Allison Courtin, acourtin@brookings.edu, 202.238.3556

Location: Washington, DC

Heard on the Brookings Cafeteria Podcast: Amy Liu Discusses New Orleans’ Resilience 10 Years After Hurricane Katrina

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Walter Lamar: Former FBI and BIA Deputy Director of Law Enforcement

“Tribal courts and police departments are generally desperately understaffed and adequate detention facilities are sorely needed in nearly every Native community in the country.”

–Walter Lamar in Indian Country Today, writing about Law Enforcement in Indian Country. Read more.

Click on his photo to learn more.

Sarah Deer: Tribal Law, Domestic Assault and Sexual Violence, Victim Rights, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) 

“…right now the tribal government, which would be the closest government to where the crime occurs, cannot take action if the perpetrator is not a Native American. So, in those situations a victim would be relying on the federal government to respond to that crime and then follow through with prosecution." 

Click on her photo to learn more. 

Janine Parry: Polling, Public Opinion, and Women and Politics

“I can say from 15 years of polling and 10,000 interviews that Arkansans are, in some ways, a little slower to adopt things, changes that are coming around the nation. So I think, you know, 10, 15 years from now, we might be having the conversations that other cities and states are having now.”

Click on her photo to learn more.

nprcodeswitch:

Sagging Pants And The Long History Of ‘Dangerous’ Street Fashion

Gene Demby

For sagging’s many detractors, kids wearing their pants below the waist — or below the butt cheeks, in the case of the look’s most fervent adherents — has doubled as a reliable shorthand for a constellation of social ills ostensibly befalling or propagated by young black men. A dangerous lack of self-respect. An embrace of gang and prison culture. Another harbinger of cultural decline. Those are all things that people say about hip-hop, which helped popularize the sagging aesthetic. And if those are the presumed stakes, it’s hardly any wonder why opposition to sagging sometimes has the feel of a full-on moral panic.