Bernard Powers

Dr. Bernard Powers is the founding director of the College of Charleston’s Center for the Study of Slavery in Charleston and a professor emeritus of history at the university. He’s an expert on African American history and culture and the role of slavery in American history.

Charleston — the city where the civil war started and where 40% of all enslaved Africans brought to the United States entered the country — has long been a center of African American history and culture. And like many American cities, it also has public Confederate monuments and statues of historical figures who supported slavery and advocated white supremacy.

As of last week, the city has one less monument. The statue of vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun in Marion Square — located just a block from Mother Emanuel AME, the site of the 2015 terrorist attack by white supremacist Dylan Roof — was removed on June 24 after a unanimous city council vote.

In a recent op-ed, Powers advocates for a new monument honoring Civil War-era African Americans — such as Charleston native Robert Smalls — as a replacement for the White Point Gardens Confederate memorial.

Over his 40-year academic career, Powers has published numerous books and articles including 1994’s Black Charlestonians:  A Social History 1822-1885, which examines the socioeconomic history of the city’s vibrant free Black population and the changes caused by emancipation after the Civil War. Most recently, he co-authored the 2016 book We Are Charleston: Tragedy and Triumph at Mother Emanuel.

Powers has also appeared in several documentaries, including the PBS series African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross and 2019’s Emanuel: the Untold Story of the Victims and Survivors of the Charleston Church Shooting. His current research focuses on African Methodism in South Carolina.

Location: Charleston, South Carolina

Expertise: African American history and culture, the role of slavery in American history

Contact information:

Email (preferred): powersb@cofc.edu

Phone: 843-813-4871

Listen to Bernard Powers on South Carolina Public Radio:

Last updated June 29, 2020

Eddie S. Glaude Jr.

Eddie S. Glaude Jr. is the William S. Tod professor of religion and African American studies and chair of the department of African American studies at Princeton University. He currently also serves as the president of the American Academy of Religion. In addition to this, he is a published author whose most well-known books include ‘Democracy in Black: How Race Still Enslaves the American Soul’ and ‘In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America’.

In 2015, Glaude was awarded an honorary doctorate from Colgate University. He is a columnist for Time magazine and regularly provides commentary on radio and television news programs.

He is currently working on a book about James Baldwin, of whom he writes, “Baldwin’s writing does not bear witness to the glory of America. It reveals the country’s sins, and the illusion of innocence that blinds us to the reality of others.“

William S. Tod professor of Religion and African American studies and Chair of the Department of African Studies at Princeton University

Location: New Jersey/ St.Thomas

Areas of Expertise: Religion, Ethics, Politics, Religion in the Americas, African American Studies

Contact Information:

E-mail: esglaude@princeton.edu
Phone: (609) 258-1319 or contact Dionne Worthy: (609) 258-8159
Twitter: @esglaude

Derrick E. White

Derrick E. White is a visiting associate professor of African and African American Studies and History at Dartmouth College.

White’s research focuses on modern black history and sports history. He is currently working on a book that inspects the intersections of college, sports and race. Specifically, he focuses on how longtime Florida A&M University football coach Jake Gaither built a program in the midst of segregation. The story of FAMU reveals the history of black college football and serves to examine the larger issues Black college athletes faced in the twentieth century.

Visiting Associate Professor of African/African American Studies & History at Dartmouth College

Location: Hanover, NH

Areas of Expertise: African American Civil Rights and Black Power Organizations, Sports and Race, Social Justice and Racial Politics

Contact Information:

E-mail: derrick.e.white@dartmouth.edu | drderrickwhite@gmail.com
Phone: Office: (603) 646-9351 | Cell: 786-897-5372
Twitter: @blackstar1906

Daina Ramey Berry

This week’s #NPRSource, Daina Ramey Berry, Ph.D., is an expert in African American History. She is an Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  Her research focuses on slavery in the United States. Berry is a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and the editor of the Gender and Slavery book series at the University of Georgia Press. She is working on publishing her book on a comprehensive study of the prices of the enslaved in the United States. She works in Austin, Texas.

Her research has been funded by The National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Association of University Women.

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Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin

Location: Austin, Texas

Contact Information:

Email: DRB@austin.utexas.edu

Phone: (512) 471-4310

Twitter: @lbofflesh

Listen to Daina Ramey Berry here:

 

Leah Wright Rigueur

Leah Wright Rigueur is a professor of history at Brandeis University. Previously, she was a professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is an expert on race and politics, modern African American history, U.S. political and social history, and riots, backlash and campus unrest. Rigueur has explored the dynamics of black Republican activists, officials and politicians as it relates to civil rights and conservatism in her book The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power. She is currently working on a book about political scandal in American politics in the 1980s through the perspective of Black officials and activists.
She has been featured on various news outlets including NPR’s All Things Considered, on the topic of Donald Trump, Black voting patterns and Black conservative viewpoints.

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Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government 

 Areas of expertise: Race and Politics, Modern African American History, U.S. Political and Social History, and Riots, Backlash and Campus Unrest, Black conservatives, Black Republicans

Location: Cambridge, MA

Contact Information:

Email: leahw@brandeis.edulwrightphd@gmail.com
Phone: 860-559-4064
Twitter: @LeahRigueur 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredAt Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

Added March 2016. Last updated February 2021.

Tiya Miles

Tiya Miles is chair of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan, where she is professor of history, American culture, Native American studies and women’s studies. Her work looking at the interrelationships between African and Cherokee people in colonial America earned her a 2011 MacArthur Foundation fellowship.

Miles has written two prize-winning books, Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom” and “The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story,” as well as numerous articles on women’s history and the black and Native interrelated experience. She has been a frequent guest on NPR’s Tell Me More.

Chair of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Elsa Barkley Brown Collegiate Professor and Professor of History, American Culture, Native American Studies and Women’s Studies at University of Michigan

Areas of Expertise: History, American History, Native American Issues, African American Studies, Interrelationship Between Native Americans and African Americans, Women’s Issues

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Contact Info:

Email: tiya@umich.edu

Office: (734) 764-5513

Heard on NPR: For a full list, click here.

Tell Me More: Who Gets To Decide Who Is Native American?

Jelani Cobb

Jelani Cobb is the Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at Columbia University. He was previously a history professor and director of the Institute of African American Studies at the University of Connecticut. He specializes in post-Civil War African American history, 20th century and modern American politics and the history of the Cold War. Cobb served as a delegate to the 2008 Democratic Convention and was selected as part of the Root 100 in 2013 — a listing of influential African American thinkers, artists, entrepreneurs and leaders.

He is a recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright and Ford Foundations. Cobb is the author of “The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama & the Paradox of Progress” and “To The Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic,” which was a finalist for the National Award for Arts Writing. His collection “The Devil & Dave Chappelle and Other Essays” was published in 2007. Cobb’s forthcoming book is titled “Antidote to Revolution: African American Anticommunism and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1931-1957.”

Cobb has contributed to a number of anthologies including In Defense of Mumia, Testimony, Mending the World and Beats, Rhymes and Life. He is a frequent contributor to NewYorker.com and his work has appeared in The New Republic, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Vibe magazine. He has also been a featured commentator on MSNBC, National Public Radio, CNN, Al-Jazeera, CBS News and a number of other national broadcast outlets.

Professor of Journalism, Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: African American Culture & History, Cold War History, 20th-Century American Politics, Contemporary Politics

Location: Hartford, CT

Contact info:

Office: 212-851-1809

Email: jelani.cobb@gmail.com

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