Martha Gulati

Martha Gulati is a professor of medicine and chief of cardiology at the University of Arizona-Phoenix. Her research interests include the study of women’s heart health and heart disease prevention practices in women. Before joining the University of Arizona’s faculty, she held the Sarah Ross Soter Chair in Women’s Cardiovascular Health and was the Section Director for Women’s Cardiovascular Health and Preventive Cardiology at Ohio State University.

Gulati has written extensively about the impact of heart disease on the lives of women. She is the current Editor-in-Chief of the American College of Cardiology’s magazine, CardioSmart and author of Saving Women’s Hearts, a bestseller. In 2012 she was named one of Chicago’s “Top 40 Under 40” by Crain’s Chicago Business. Her work has been published in a number of news outlets and peer-reviewed journals including The New England Journal of Medicine, The New York Times and CBS National News.


Professor of Medicine and Chief of Cardiology, University of Arizona at Phoenix

Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Areas of Expertise: Cardiology, women’s health, higher education, medical journalism

Contact Information

E-mail: marthagulati@email.arizona.edu

Phone: (602) 521-3128

Twitter: @drmarthagulati

https://www.npr.org/player/embed/526048767/526349542

Nilanjana Bhattacharjya

Nilanjana Bhattacharjya is an ethnomusicologist and popular music scholar who focuses on South Asian popular music and film in India, as well as in the South Asian diaspora. She currently teaches interdisciplinary courses on the humanities, Asian Studies, music, and film at Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University. She has been researching how respective communities use music to define their identities, and how the meaning of that music changes as it travels one location to another since she began her doctoral research in 1999. Her research has focused on topics including the transnational career of the early 20th century dancer Uday Shankar in the United States and Europe, British popular musicians of South Asian descent in London during the mid 1990s through early 2000s, and Hindi film music sequences’ role in popular Hindi films. She is particularly interested in how the song sequence— once the distinctive marker of an Indian popular film— is evolving to respond to developments in the film and music industries, as well as changing tastes.

Her publications appear in the journals Asian Music, South Asian History and Culture, andSouth Asian Popular Culture, and the books Global Bollywood: Travels of Hindi Music and Dance, and South Asian Transnationalisms: Cultural Exchange in the Twentieth Century. 

Most recently, she has been working closely with other scholars who focus on the South Asian diaspora in the United States as a member and current co-chair of the Academic Council of the South Asian American Digital Archive <https://www.saadigitalarchive.org/>, which aims to raise awareness about South Asian American history by preserving historical documents and making them available to the public.

Nilanjana Bhattacharjya
Honors Faculty Fellow at Barrett, the Honors College at Arizona State University

Areas of Expertise: Ethnomusicology, South Asian popular music, Music and migration, South Asian popular culture, South Asian popular culture in the diaspora, South Asian American history, South Asian immigration

Location: Tempe, AZ

Contact Information:
Email: nilanjana.bhattacharjya@asu.edu
Phone: 480-727-6642

Heard on NPR Morning Edition: How The ‘Kung Fu Fighting’ Melody Came To Represent Asia

Added May 2015

Manley Begay

Navajo Nation citizen Manley Begay is an expert in tribal economic development and indigenous governance. He is the faculty chair of the Native Nations Institute at the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Senior Lecturer in the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Arizona.

He serves as co-director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, as well as on a number of national boards focusing on Native American development and wellness.

Begay’s research focuses on Native American education, tribal governance and law. His work has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Manley Begay

Senior Lecturer of American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona

Areas of Expertise: Tribal Economic Development, Educational Leadership, Indigenous Governance, Native American Issues

Location: Tucson, AZ

Contact Information:

Email: mbegay@email.arizona.edu
Phone: (520) 626-8629

Heard at the Native Nations Institute: Rebuilding Native Nations: “The Importance of Cultural Match”

Added February 2015

Pedro Gomez

Pedro Gomez has been an ESPN baseball reporter and commentator for ten years, covering everything from spring training to the controversy surrounding Barry Bond’s steroid use. He serves as a commentator on SportsCenter, Baseball Tonight, and other ESPN studio shows.

Prior to joining ESPN, Gomez was a sports columnist and baseball writer for the Arizona Republic, the Sacramento Bee, the San Jose Mercury News, Miami Herald, San Diego Union, and the Miami News. According to his bio, he is “a member of the Baseball Writers Association of America, has covered more than 15 World Series 10 All-Star Games, and is a voting member for the Baseball Hall of Fame.”
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ESPN Reporter and Commentator

Areas of Expertise: Baseball, Sports Writing

Location: Phoenix, AZ

Contact Info:

Phone: (602) 206-5072

Twitter: @pedrogomezESPN

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

All Things Considered: The Ongoing Saga Of Manny Ramirez

Heard on ESPN: