Christen A. Smith

Dr. Christen A. Smith is an associate professor of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies and the director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She’s an expert on Black liberation and state violence against Black communities in the Americas.

Smith can provide context on the anthropological background of police violence against Black communities. Her recent research examines the lingering and deadly impacts of police violence on Black women, communities and families in the U.S. and Brazil.

Her 2016 book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil explores the ironic relationship between police violence against Black Brazilians in Salvador, Bahia and the celebration and consumption of Black culture, music and art.

Smith is also the founder of Cite Black Women, which promotes the intellectual and academic work of Black women — historically overlooked and undervalued. Through a blog, podcast and social media campaign, the project pushes people to reexamine their blind spots on race and gender and start using and citing the work of Black female sources.

Location: Austin, TX

Expertise: Black liberation, resistance and state violence against Black communities in the Americas

Contact information:

Email: christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @profsassy

Listen to Christen A. Smith on KQED’s World Affairs:

Last updated July 22, 2020

Daina Ramey Berry

This week’s #NPRSource, Daina Ramey Berry, Ph.D., is an expert in African American History. She is an Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  Her research focuses on slavery in the United States. Berry is a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and the editor of the Gender and Slavery book series at the University of Georgia Press. She is working on publishing her book on a comprehensive study of the prices of the enslaved in the United States. She works in Austin, Texas.

Her research has been funded by The National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Association of University Women.

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Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin

Location: Austin, Texas

Contact Information:

Email: DRB@austin.utexas.edu

Phone: (512) 471-4310

Twitter: @lbofflesh

Listen to Daina Ramey Berry here:

 

Jennifer Eberhardt

Jennifer L. Eberhardt is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and a 2014 MacArthur Fellow. Eberhardt is a Social Psychologist with nearly 20 years of teaching and research work, much of it focused on what she describes as “the stereotypical associations between blacks and crime.” Since 1998, Eberhardt has been at Stanford University, where she is an Associate Professor of Psychology and co-director of Social Psychological Answers to Real-World Questions (SPARQ).

Eberhardt received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1993, and began her teaching career at Yale University, working in Psychology, African, and African American Studies Departments, while also being a research fellow at the Center for Race, Inequality, and Politics. In addition to Eberhardt’s research on racial profiling, she’s currently assisting law enforcement agencies to develop improved methods of serving their communities, and working with colleagues from other scientific disciplines on a new way to explain cognitive dehumanization by breaking down it’s process and how it aids in discrimination and marginalization in our society.

She has spoken on various panels, at Stanford University’s panel discussing how race alters perception of people, places, and things, at the U.S. Department of Justice with the Racial Disparities Working Group, and at the Ford Foundation Conference on a panel discussing ‘Renewing Communities: Improving educational access in California’s correctional facilities and beyond.’ In addition, Eberhardt has been quoted in the Stanford News, the Oakland Tribune, and co-authored an op-ed for The New York Times.

2014 MacArthur Award Winner Jennifer Eberhardt, Stanford University.

2014 MacArthur Fellow and Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford University

Areas of Expertise: Sociology, Science, Racial Stereotyping, Psychology, Human Development, Law

Location: Stanford, CA

Contact Information:

Email: jleberhardt@stanford.edu

Dr. Eberhardt’s assistant, Lynda Ichinaga
Email: ichinaga@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 725-2449

Heard on the MacArthur Foundation Website: Introducing Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Added December 2014

Keisha Bentley-Edwards

Dr. Keisha L. Bentley-Edwards is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Human Development & Culture and Learning Sciences Faculty Affiliate, African & African Diaspora Studies Department, at the University of Texas at Austin.

Bentley-Edwards researches the experiences of youth in racial socialization, looking into sociopolitical agency and cohesion among African Americans, as well as white racial socialization, and the messages that white parents provide to their children around race.

Her work examines how cultural strengths can be used to minimize the negative outcomes related to racism stress, violence, aggression, bullying, and community stressors.

Keisha Bentley-Edwards
Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Human Development & Culture and Learning Sciences Faculty Affiliate, African & African Diaspora Studies Department, University of Texas at Austin

Areas of Expertise: Psychological Development of the African American Experience in the United States, Adolescent Racial Socialization, Human Development, Culture, Learning Sciences

Location: Austin, TX (September-May); Durham, NC (June-August)

Contact Information:
Email:
kbentleyedwards@austin.utexas.edu
Phone: (714) 614-0728 (c)
Twitter:
@Keisha_Bentley

Heard on NPR Source of the Week: Dr. Bentley-Edwards Discusses The Reaction After Ferguson

Otis Brawley

Otis W. Brawley, M.D. FACP is Chief Medical and Scientific Officer and Vice President of the American Cancer Society, and teaches at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. He is Professor of Hematology, Oncology, Medicine and Epidemiology. Brawley is not only a medical expert in his field, but also speaks often about cancer prevention and the value of early detection. He received the Key to St. Bernard Parish for work done with the U.S. Public Health Service after Hurricane Katrina.

Brawley is also on the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, and is a Senior Research Fellow at the International Prevention Research Institute. In the past, he’s been on the Food and Drug Administration Oncologic Drug Advisory Committee, and chaired the National Institutes of Health Consensus Panel on the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease.

Brawley has been featured on NPR and TEDMED, as well as print publications like The New York Times. He has written for the Washington Post.

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Chief Medical Officer for the American Cancer Society

Areas of Expertise: Cancer Research & Education, Epidemiology, Oncology

Location: Atlanta, GA

Contact Information:

Email: otis.brawley@cancer.org

For interview requests sent via email, please CC Tawanna Brooks, (tawanna.brooks@cancer.org) Administrative Services Manager at the American Cancer Society.

Phone: 404-329-7740 (Office)

Heard on NPR’s All Things Considered: Studies Reignite Mammography Debate for Middle Aged Women

Beverly Tatum

Beverly Tatum is the president of Spelman College, a historically black liberal arts college for women in Atlanta. Before becoming Spelman’s president in 2002, Tatum was a professor of psychology at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. Prior to Mount Holyoke, Tatum taught psychology at Westfield State College and was a lecturer in black studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Tatum’s research interests include black families in white communities, racial identity in teens, and the role of race in the classroom. She has written three books, including 2007’s Can We Talk About Race? And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation.

President Barack Obama appointed Tatum to the Advisory Board for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Tatum received the Brock International Prize in Education in 2005 for her leadership and academic contributions.


President of Spelman College

Areas of Expertise: Higher Education, Clinical Psychology, Race Relations, Race, Racial Identity

Location: Atlanta, GA

Contact Information:
Phone: (404) 270-5822 (o) | (404) 569-2789 (c)
Twitter: @BDTSpelman

You can also email or call the President’s Office at Spelman:
Email: presidentsoffice@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5001

Or you can contact Tomika DePriest or Terrilyn Simmons:

Tomika’s Email: tdepriest@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5060

Terrilyn’s Email: tsimmons8@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5822 (o) | (404) 569-2789 (c)

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: Spelman And Other HBCUs Cut Back