Jim Trotter

Jim Trotter is an NFL reporter and analyst, formerly a senior writer at Sports Illustrated (SI) and ESPN. You can read his columns on SI’s Inside the NFL. He is a regular contributor to CBS Sports and ESPN Radio and podcasts. Trotter has also appeared on Larry King’s Ora TV.

Trotter graduated from Howard University with a bachelor’s degree in communications. Before joining SI in 2007, he covered the San Diego Chargers for the San Diego Union-Tribune for more than ten years.

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Jim Trotter

Areas of Expertise: NFL, Football, Sports

Location: San Diego, CA
Contact Info:

Email: JimTrotter.NFL@gmail.com

Twitter: @JimTrotter_NFL

 

Heard on CBSSports.com

 

Tina Trujillo

Tina Trujillo is an Associate Professor at the University of California Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education. She is an expert on education inequality, federal educational policymaking, and test-based educational reforms. Trujillo’s research focuses on the politics of urban district reform and the effects of standardized testing. The American Educational Research Journal and Teachers College Record are among the numerous journals that have published her work. She can be heard contributing her expertise on NPR’s Morning Edition, here.

tina

Associate Professor at UC Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education 

Area of Expertise: Educational Inequality, Federal Education Policymaking, Test-Based Educational Reforms and High-Stakes Testing

Location: Berkeley, CA

Contact Information:

Email: trujillo@berkeley.edu

Phone: (510) 642- 6272

[cell] (510) 517-0874;

[fax] (510) 642-4803

Twitter: @TinaTrujillo10

Heard on NPR’s Morning Edition: California Brings Gay History Into The Classroom 

Source(s) This Week: Dr. Henri Ford and Dr. Purna Kashyap

We’re still hanging out with NPR’s Science Desk this week, and our sources were recommended by Michaeleen Doucleff. Here’s what she said about these experts:

Henri Ford

“Pediatric surgeon and Harvard grad Dr. Henri Ford is chief of surgery at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. And he’s a great source on neonatal surgery, medical education, inequalities in the U.S. healthcare system and global surgery.

After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Ford returned to where he grew up – Port-au-Prince – and literally hit the streets looking for the wounded. When Ford returned to the U.S., he gave up a lucrative offer in Pittsburgh to take his current post in East Los Angeles. Why? He wanted patient diversity. A friend of mine, who worked under Dr. Ford, summed why he should be on the air: “Dr. Ford has a powerful, charismatic voice and his message is from the heart.”

Purna Kashyap

Dr. Purna Kashyap, a gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., is a fantastic source for discussing the health implications of the microbiome and for diseases connected to the gut and diet, such as diabetes, IBD, celiac disease and food allergies.

What impresses me the most about Dr. Kashyap is his honesty – even when it comes to discussing taboo topics. Last summer I talked to him about the science behind … well, flatulence … and he explained how it’s actually a sign of a healthy microbiome. “A healthy individual can have up to 18 flatulences per day and be perfectly normal,“ he said. “Eating foods that cause gas is the only way for the microbes in the gut to get nutrients.”

Want more experts? Follow us @SourceOfTheWeek and #NPRSource for updates. Want to recommend experts? Email us at sourceoftheweek@npr.org!

Source(s) of the Week: Michelle Asha Cooper and Patricia Gándara

We’re still with the Education Team this week with Elissa Nadworny guest editing, and she’s handpicked some pretty great and versatile sources!

Michelle Asha Cooper

“However, the more systemic instances of racism that permeate higher education are rarely acknowledged. Our failure, for example, to really talk about race manifests in a growing trend among higher education professionals and advocates, like myself, to use the more mainstream term of “equity.” While race is often implicit in these conversations, “equity” is quickly becoming a catchall phrase that could easily, once again, marginalize the issue of race.

Equity does prompt attention to a range of marginalized populations based on markers such as socioeconomic status, gender, etc. – important lenses for addressing discrimination – but discrete attention to race is often lost in the process. I also recognize that the term equity is more palatable; after all, initiating a conversation by talking about race is often a nonstarter. But just because we are uncomfortable with the word, or more specifically, uncomfortable with our country’s racial past and its lingering effects, does not mean that the blemish is not there. To the contrary, our discomfort allows these wounds to deepen.”

Michelle Asha Cooper, in an essay for Inside Higher Ed, “Ending Racism Is Still a Civil Rights Issue”

Patricia Gandara

“The straw that breaks the camel’s back is when economically this really comes home to folks in these states that are on the edge of decline right now as a result of failing to educate this population. So you look at California and Texas—two states in which half or more of their K-12 population is Latino. And there have been studies done that look at what the consequences of that are economically for the state… Well, California right now can’t close its budget gaps. That’s not all because of Latino kids. But it’s a piece of it. We’re not generating enough income because we’re not generating the kind of educational product that we need. So my hope is that people begin to connect the dots and realize this is affecting each of us because the state is not going to be able to sustain itself.”

Patricia Gándara, discussing the Latino achievement gap in an interview with the Hechinger Report

Here’s your reminder to follow us @sourceoftheweek and #NPRSource if you’d like updates on the sources we add to our database.

Email us at sourceoftheweek@npr.org if you have any recommendations.

Oliver Wang

 

Oliver Wang is a music writer and cultural critic whose work has been published in almost every major hip-hop magazine: The Source, XXL, Vibe, Scratch and others. He has written about race, popular culture and music for Mother Jones, Spin, The Nation and the LA Times.

Wang is a frequent contributor to NPR and KPCC in California and runs the audioblog SoulSides.com. He teaches sociology at California State University at Long Beach, with a focus on race/ethnicity and social issues.

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Music Writer and Cultural Critic, Professor of Sociology at California State University at Long Beach

Areas of Expertise: Music, Sports, Cultural Studies, Sociology, Race & Ethnicity, Hip-Hop

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Contact Info:

Email: oliverwang@gmail.com

Phone: (510) 593-3565

Twitter: @soulsidescom
Heard on NPR: For a full list, click here.

Tell Me More: Asian-American Artists Break Into Soul Music

 


All Things Considered: Kanye’s Latest A Deeply Personal Departure