Mae Ngai

Mae Ngai (nye) is a professor of history and Asian American studies at Columbia University. According to her bio, she was previously “a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education.” She has written about immigration for organizations such as The New York Times, The Nation, and the Boston Review.

Ngai is the author of two books, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004) and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010).  She is also working on a third book, Yellow and Gold: The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908.

 

Professor of History and Asian American Studies at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration History and Policy, Asian American Studies, U.S. Legal and Political History, Citizenship, Nationalism

Location: New York City


Contact Info:

Phone: (646) 438-1701

Email: mn53@columbia.edu

You can listen to Ngai speak about border security on CCTV:

Cristina Rodriguez

Cristina Rodriguez teaches constitutional law, administrative law, and immigration law at Yale Law School. She is the first tenured Latino faculty member. She earned both her B.A. and J.D. at Yale and was previously a professor at NYU School of Law. From January 2011 to January 2013, Rodriguez worked in the Office of Legal Counsel in the U.S. Department of Justice as Deputy Assistant Attorney General.

Dean Robert Post of Yale Law School describes Rodriguez as “the nation’s leading theorist of immigration law.” She has written about immigration policy, civil rights and migration for The New York Times, CNN and numerous other publications.

According to her bio, Rodriguez attended Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar. She clerked for Justice Sandra Day O’Connor of the U.S. Supreme Court and Judge David S. Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit.


Professor of Law, Yale Law School

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Immigration Law and Policy, Constitutional Law, Administrative Law, the Supreme Court, Executive Branch, Effects of Immigration on Society and Culture, Language Rights and Policy, Migration, Civil Rights & Citizenship

Location: New Haven, CT


Contact Information:
Email: cristina.rodriguez@yale.edu

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

All Things Considered: What’s Different Today For Ariz. Illegal Immigrants?

Tell Me More: More States Expected To Introduce Anti-Illegal Immigration Laws

 

Tom Wong

Tom K. Wong is an assistant professor of political science at the University of California, San Diego. He was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Tower Center for Political Studies at Southern Methodist University and a lecturer in the department of political science at UC Riverside. Wong has also contributed to the National Asian American Survey (led by Karthick Ramakrishnan.)

Wong is the founder of the Dream Project, “a non-profit oral history project led by current and former undocumented youths and allies.” According to his CV, he is working on a book called “Rights, Deportation, and Detention in the Age of Immigration Control.”

Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego

Areas of Expertise: Comparative Politics, Immigration, Immigration Politics and Policy, Human Rights, Citizenship

Location: San Diego, CA

Contact Info:

Phone: (951) 907-9989

Email: tomkwong@ucsd.edu

Twitter: @twong002

Heard on KPCC:

Take Two: Predicting how Congress will vote on immigration reform