Dolores Albarracín

Dr. Dolores Albarracín is a professor of psychology, business and medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She’s an expert in social and clinical psychology and can provide insight on how the anti-vaccination movement and the spread of misinformation on social media are affecting the coronavirus pandemic.

At the University of Illinois, Albarracín directs the Social Action Lab and the Health, Social Media and Technology Group, where she studies social cognition and action, communication, misinformation and changes in behaviors and attitudes.

Her work there has focused on COVID-19, substance use, HIV/AIDS and vaccines. Recent publications include a study on the ways anti-vaccination social media posts influence vaccine behavior and her April 2020 research finding that Americans who consume conservative media are more likely to believe conspiracy theories about the coronavirus.

Albarracín has authored five books and 170 journal articles and book chapters and served as the editor-in-chief of Psychological Bulletin from 2014 to 2020. She received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1997, and has been a tenured professor at the University of Florida and at the University of Pennsylvania.

Location: Urbana, IL

Expertise Field: Social and clinical psychology, behavior and attitudes, communication, misinformation and public health

Contact information:

Email: dalbarra@illinois.edu 

Phone: 217-840-2383

Twitter: @socialactionlab

Listen to Dolores Albarracín on Hidden Brain:

Last updated September 8, 2020

Rosario Ceballo

Rosario (Rosie) Ceballo, Ph.D. is a clinical and developmental psychologist whose research investigates the effects of living in poverty on children’s development. In particular, she examines the impact of exposure to community violence on children’s academic and psychological functioning.

In another line of research, Dr. Ceballo studies the effects of infertility and racial stereotypes about women’s reproductive abilities on racial/ethnic minority women. Utilizing quantitative as well as qualitative methods, she has published extensively across clinical, developmental, and feminist psychology journals.

Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on an NSF (National Science Foundation) funded longitudinal study with Latino adolescents residing in high-risk, urban neighborhoods. Dr. Ceballo presently serves as a member of the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Committee on Socioeconomic Status, and she is the incoming chair of the Women’s Studies Department at the University of Michigan.

Rosario Ceballo

Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan

Areas of Expertise: After-School Activities, Community Violence; Parenting; Poverty; Infertility; Latino Cultural Values

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Contact Information:
Email: rosarioc@umich.edu
Phone: (734) 936-6049 or (734) 763-2047

Heard on NPR’s Source of the Week: Rosie Ceballo Discusses Role Of ‘Familismo’ As Protective Factor For Latino Adolescents

Added June 2015

Rey Junco

Rey Junco (HOON-koh) is a faculty associate at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. He researches how youth interact with social media and technology and how this affects development, engagement, and learning.

Junco’s most recent studies include “Comparing actual and self-reported measures of Facebook use” and “In-class multitasking and academic performance.” He has been on Tell Me More discussing kids’ online privacy and teenagers who post racist tweets.

Junco holds a doctorate in counselor education and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Penn State University. He blogs at Social Media in Higher Education.

Associate Professor of Library Science in the Purdue University Libraries, Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University

Areas of Expertise: Social Media, Youth and Media, Higher Education, Clinical Psychology, Library Sciences

Location: West Lafayette, IN


Contact Info:

Phone: (814) 441-0339

Email:rjunco@cyber.law.harvard.edu

Twitter: @reyjunco

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: Keeping Up With Kids’ Online Privacy

Beverly Tatum

Beverly Tatum is the president of Spelman College, a historically black liberal arts college for women in Atlanta. Before becoming Spelman’s president in 2002, Tatum was a professor of psychology at Mount Holyoke College in Massachusetts. Prior to Mount Holyoke, Tatum taught psychology at Westfield State College and was a lecturer in black studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Tatum’s research interests include black families in white communities, racial identity in teens, and the role of race in the classroom. She has written three books, including 2007’s Can We Talk About Race? And Other Conversations in an Era of School Resegregation.

President Barack Obama appointed Tatum to the Advisory Board for the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Tatum received the Brock International Prize in Education in 2005 for her leadership and academic contributions.


President of Spelman College

Areas of Expertise: Higher Education, Clinical Psychology, Race Relations, Race, Racial Identity

Location: Atlanta, GA

Contact Information:
Phone: (404) 270-5822 (o) | (404) 569-2789 (c)
Twitter: @BDTSpelman

You can also email or call the President’s Office at Spelman:
Email: presidentsoffice@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5001

Or you can contact Tomika DePriest or Terrilyn Simmons:

Tomika’s Email: tdepriest@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5060

Terrilyn’s Email: tsimmons8@spelman.edu
Phone: (404) 270-5822 (o) | (404) 569-2789 (c)

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: Spelman And Other HBCUs Cut Back