Rita Cameron Wedding

Rita Cameron Wedding is a professor of Women’s Studies and Ethnic Studies at Sacramento State University, California. She is an expert on juvenile justice and implicit bias.

Cameron Wedding is an expert faculty member for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, where she has trained judges on court improvement initiatives in over 40 states. 

She was also a consultant for the Annie E. Casey Foundation, one of the largest child advocacy foundations in the U.S.

Cameron Wedding has also provided expert testimony before the U.S. Commission on Child Abuse and Neglect Fatalities and conducted research for expert testimony in a federal jury trial.  

Rita

 

Areas of Expertise: Juvenile Justice and Reform, Implicit Bias

Location: Sacramento, California

Contact Info:

       Email: drrcamwed@aol.com

       Phone: (916) 956-1462

She can be heard here:

Kristin Henning

Kristin Henning is a Professor of Law and Director of the Juvenile Justice Clinic and Initiative at Georgetown Law. She is an expert on Juvenile Justice, Adolescence and Policing, and Race. 

Henning was previously the Lead Attorney for the Juvenile Unit of the D.C. Public Defender Service and is currently the Director of the Mid-Atlantic Juvenile Defender Center.

She is also President of the Board of Directors for the Center for Children’s Law and Policy, and has served as an expert consultant on juvenile justice to a number of state and federal agencies. 

Henning has represented juveniles in serious cases, supervised and trained new Public Defender Service attorneys, and coordinated and conducted training for court-appointed attorneys representing juveniles. 

Henning closer teaching

Areas of Expertise: Juvenile Justice, Race, Adolescence and Policing, Juvenile Justice Reform

Location: Washington D.C. 

Contact Info:

       Email: hennink@georgetown.edu 

       Phone: (202) 215-5754

       Twitter: @profkrishenning

She can be heard here:

Khalilah Brown-Dean

Khalilah Brown-Dean is an Associate Professor of political science at Quinnipiac University. Her research interests include the political dynamics surrounding the criminal justice system, especially as it relates to voting rights policies.

Before coming to Quinnipiac, Brown-Dean was the Peter Strauss Family Assistant Professor of African-American Studies at Yale University. Her political commentary and analysis has been featured in a number of outlets including The New York Times, the American Urban Radio Network and WNPR’s “Where We Live” blog. Brown-Dean’s most recent book, Once Convicted, Forever Doomed: Race Punishment ad Governance explores how humans’ relationship to punishment impairs both the strength and function of American governance.


Associate Professor of political science, Quinnipiac University

Location: Hamden, Connecticut

Areas of Expertise: Criminal justice, voting rights, political dynamics, mass incarceration, public policy

Contact Information:
E-mail: john.morgan@quinnipiac.edu
Phone: (203) 206-4449 © or (203) 582-5359 (office)

Kristen Clarke

Kristen Clarke is president and executive director of the National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. In this capacity she is a legal advocate on behalf of the rights of communities of color, especially in the areas of social justice, equal economic opportunity, criminal justice and judicial diversity, among others.

Before joining the Lawyers’ Committee, Clarke spent several years at the NAACP’s Legal Defense and Educational Fund where she helped lead the organization’s efforts in voting rights and election law reform across the country. Before joining the LDF, she worked at the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, where she served as a federal prosecutor, handling cases of police brutality, hate crimes, and human trafficking. Clarke is a regular contributor to a number of outlets including CNN, MSNBC and TV One as well as a 2017 recipient of Quinnipiac University’s Thurgood Marshall Award, among others.

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President and Executive Director, National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Areas of Expertise: Criminal justice, police brutality, civil liberties, hate speech, civil litigation, diversity

Location: Washington, D.C.

Contact Info:
Email: DRobinson@LawyersCommittee.org
Twitter: @KristenClarkeJD

Shirley Leyro, Ph.D.

Shirley Leyro, Ph.D. is an expert criminologist. She is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Borough of Manhattan Community College at City University of New York (CUNY). Her research focuses on criminal law and immigration. She works in New York, New York.

Her research has been funded by grants, fellowships, and awards provided by the Graduate Center at City University of New York (CUNY).

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Adjunct Professor of Criminal Justice

Location: New York, New York

Contact Information:

Email: sleyro@bmcc.cuny.edu

Phone: (646) 244-1211

Twitter: @Shir_Lo

Listen to Shirley Leyro here:

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve

Nicole Gonzalez Van Cleve is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She is an expert on criminal justice, mass incarceration, police brutality, criminal defense racism and criminal courts. Van Cleve focuses her research on the cultural impact of mass incarceration and the racial injustice within criminal courts. Her new book, Crook County: Racism and Injustice in America’s Largest Criminal Court  “reveals the paradoxes and pain of our modern legal culture, including the effects on the punished and punishers” according to  Henry Louis Gates. She has provided legal commentary on several news networks including MSNBC’s The Rachel Maddow Show, discussing cultural problems with Chicago police, seen here.

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at Temple University

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice, Mass Incarceration, Police Brutality, Criminal Defense Racism, Criminal Courts and Criminal Court Reform

Location: Philadelphia, PA

Contact Information:

Email: nvancleve@temple.edu 

Publicist info (Emi Battaglia):

ebpr@yahoo.com 

914-584-8297

Twitter:@nvancleve

Heard on MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow Show

 

Alexes Harris

Dr. Alexes Harris teaches at the University of Washington and serves as an affiliate at the West Coast Poverty Center and Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology. A driving aim of her work is to produce empirically based research that is theoretically informed, and has real world policy implications for addressing social problems and inequality in the United States. Her most current research examines the sentencing of monetary sanctions, such as fines, fees, and surcharges, to people convicted of felony offenses in Washington state. Using a mixed-method approach, she has analyzed Administrative Office of the Courts data, conducted observations of sentencing and sanctioning hearings, and conducted interviews with court officials to examine variation in sentencing, supervision and sanctioning practices related to unpaid debt.

Harris’ work has been published in a number of academic journals, including The American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Law and Society Review and Symbolic Interaction. With a recently awarded grant, Harris is continuing her research on monetary sanctions to replicate and expand her Washington study in seven other states with collaborators. Harris has testified before the Washington State legislature and Washington State Supreme Court about racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system and sentencing practices. She was recently appointed by United States Attorney General to a four‐year appointment on the Office of Justice Programs Science Advisory Board.

Alexes Harris

Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice Processing and Sentencing of Monetary Sanctions, Race and Ethnicity In The United States

Location: Seattle, WA

Contact Information:

Email: yharris@uw.edu
Website: Alexesharris.com

Heard on NPR Morning Edition: Ferguson’s Plan To Cut Back On Court Fees Could Inspire Change

Added August 2015

Last Verified: August 2015

Paul Butler

Paul Butler is a professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center, teaching in the areas of criminal law and race and the law. He served as a federal prosecutor with the U.S. Department of Justice, where his specialty was public corruption.

Butler is one of the nation’s most frequently consulted scholars on issues of race and criminal justice. He has been featured on 60 Minutes, Nightline, ABC, CBS and NBC, and is a frequent guest on NPR’s Tell Me More.

Butler has published numerous academic articles in journals including the Yale Law Journal and the Harvard Law Review, and is the author of the book, “Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice.”

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Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice, Civil Rights & Race Relations, Public Corruption

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: paul.butler@law.georgetown.edu

Heard on NPR:

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Gabriela Rivera

Gabriela Rivera is the Yale Public Interest Fellow with the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties. As an attorney with the ACLU her work focuses on addressing due process violations in immigration detention, discriminatory policing practices, and abuses of local police partnerships with federal immigration enforcement authorities.

Gabriela is one of the lead attorneys on a class action lawsuit filed in federal court in Los Angeles in June 2013, challenging the methods of coercion and pressure that Border Patrol and ICE agents employ to convince Mexican nationals to sign their own expulsion orders.

Prior to the ACLU she worked with the Federal Defenders, the Yale Law School Reentry Clinic and the Criminal Defense Project, where she focused on mitigating collateral consequences and immigration consequences of criminal convictions.


Legal Fellow/Staff Attorney at ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties

Areas of Expertise: Constitutional and Administrative Law, Immigrant Rights, Racial Justice, Police Practices, Criminal Justice, Economic Justice, Immigration Law, International Human Rights Law

Location: San Diego, CA

Contact Information:
Email:
 Grivera@aclusandiego.org
Phone: (619) 398-4495

Rivera speaks about immigration for the ACLU: 

 

Charles Ogletree

Charles J. Ogletree is the Jesse Climenko professor of law at Harvard University and the director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice. After earning an M.A. and B.A. in Political Science from Stanford University and his J.D. from Harvard Law School, Ogletree began his career as a staff attorney in the District of Columbia Public Defender Service. He later entered into private practice in the law firm of Jessamy, Fort & Ogletree.

According to his bio, he was named of the 100 Most Influential Blacks In America by Savoy Magazine and one of the “legal legends among America’s top black lawyers” by Black Enterprise Magazine.

He is the author of All Deliberate Speed: Reflections on the First Half-Century of Brown v. Board of Education and Beyond The Rodney King Story: An Investigation Of Police Conduct In Minority Communities.

Professor of Law at Harvard University Law School

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Law, Death Penalty, Juvenile Justice, DNA Fingerprinting, Race and Criminal Justice, South Africa, International Law, Legal Ethics, Public Defence, Criminal Justice Systems

Location: Cambridge, MA

Contact Info:

Phone:  (617) 495-5097

Email:  ogletree@law.harvard.edu

Or you can contact his assistant, Darrick Northington: (617) 496-2054

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

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Heard on WBUR: For a complete list, click here.

Red Sox Acknowledge Racism-Tinged Past