Isabel Araiza

Dr. Isabel Araiza is an associate professor of sociology at Texas A&M Corpus Christi, where she teaches in the Mexican American and women and gender studies programs. She’s an expert on sociology and its intersections with education, social class and inequality. 

Araiza has also spoken up against the university’s plans for in-person classes this fall despite the coronavirus pandemic. Many schools have abandoned plans for in-person instruction this fall due to outbreaks — most notably, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made the rest of the semester entirely online after 130 students tested positive in the first week of classes.

Araiza’s recent research has focused on access to clean water, the political preferences of Latinos, Hispanic serving institutions of higher education in Texas and the community impact of the integration of Corpus Christi Independent School District in the 1970s.

Born and raised in Corpus Christi, Araiza went on to earn her PhD in sociology from Boston College. As a public sociologist actively engaged in her community, Araiza is a founding member of For the Greater Good, a local advocacy organization that pushes for access to clean water and investment in public institutions and infrastructure.

She’s also co-authored several health needs assessments on the community needs and uses of hospitals in the Coastal Bend region of South Texas.

Location: Corpus Christi, TX

Expertise Field: Universities and the coronavirus, sociology, Mexican American studies, women and gender studies, social class, education, inequality 

Contact information:

Email: isabel.araiza@tamucc.edu

Phone (cell): 361-779-3927

Phone (office): 361-825-3936

Listen to Isabel Araiza on KIII:

Last updated August 24, 2020

Linda Greene

Linda Greene is a Law Professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison, where she researches and teaches Sports Law and Constitutional Law. She was the United States Olympic Committee Legislation Committee Chair, its Audit Committee Vice Chair, and co-author of its diversity and inclusion policies. She is a co-founder of Black Women in Sports Foundation and the author of articles and op-eds that explore the intersection of sport and equality. She has written about the inclusion of women in Olympic governing bodies, equity between male and female Olympians, and how women athletes are represented in the media. She has been featured on Wisconsin Public Radio, NPR, and has written opinion pieces in The New York Times since 1992.

Linda GreeneLaw Professor, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Areas of Expertise: Olympics, Gender in Olympics, Sports, Sports Law, Women in Sports

Contact Info:

Email: divaprof@gmail.com

Phone: (608) 332-1840

Heard on NPR:

Suyapa Portillo Villeda

Suyapa Portillo Villeda is an assistant professor in Chicana/o Latina/o Transnational Studies at Pitzer College. Her work broadly focuses on social movements in Central America with a focus on Honduras. In particular, Portillo’s research centers on the intersections between labor, gender, and race in workers’ lives in the history of the banana export economy in Honduras and Central America.

Since the coup d’état in Honduras in 2009, Portillo has served as region expert in the media to attest to conditions in Honduras and the rest of Central America. Her expertise has been cited by CNN, NPR’s Take Two, and The Huffington Post.

Suyapa Portillo photo
Assistant Professor in Chicana/o-Latina/o Transnational Studies, Pitzer College

Areas of Expertise: Chicana/o Latina/o Transnational Studies, Labor, Gender, Ethnicity, Race, Honduras, Central America, History of Immigration and Migration in Central America, LGBTQ Community in Honduras

Location: Los Angeles, CA | Honduras

Contact Information:
Email: Suyapa_portillo@pitzer.edu
Twitter: @SuyapaPV

As Heard On KPCC’s Take Two: “Young Migrants From Honduras Fleeing Drug and Gang Violence”

Seema Yasmin

Seema Yasmin is a reporter at the Dallas Morning News, professor of public health at the University of Texas at Dallas and Medical Contributor for both CNN and NBC Channel 5. An expert in epidemiology, she has served as a disease detective at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has her own column for the Dallas Morning News called ‘Debunked’, which exposes medical myths.

Yasmin has examined epidemics in Kenya, Botswana, the United Kingdom and the Americas, working in environments ranging from maximum security prisons to American Indian reservations. Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals as well as the Scientific American and Reuters. In 2016 her reporting on Chagas Disease won an Emmy for Continued Coverage. The same year, her first collection of poetry won the Diode Editions chapbook contest.

Reporter at Dallas Morning News and Professor of Public Health at University of Texas at Dallas

Location: Washington, D.C.

Areas of Expertise: Epidemiology, journalism, media studies, gender-based violence, public health, multimedia storytelling

Contact Information:

E-mail: seemayasmin@gmail.com
Twitter: @DoctorYasmin

https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485204926/485204927

Sarah J. Jackson

Sarah J. Jackson is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies and faculty affiliate of the Department of Cultures, Societies and Global Studies at Northeastern University. Her research and teaching interests include the use of media and technology to represent racial justice and social movements, with a particular focus on the role of social media in activism. Her research on the use of Twitter by journalists and activists has been funded by the Knight foundation.

Jackson is also a faculty affiliate of Northeastern’s Women’s Gender & Sexuality Studies program. Her most recent book, Black Celebrity, Racial Politics and the Press examines the relationship between race, celebrity protest and the media. Her commentary has been featured on PBS, Politico and NPR’s On Point with Tom Ashbrook.

Sarah Jackson
Assistant Professor of Communication Studies and Faculty Affiliate of Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Northeastern University

Areas of Expertise: Communications, Media Studies, Technology, Gender Studies, Social Media, Politics, Culture, Social Sciences

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Contact Information:
E-mail: s.jackson@northeastern.edu
Phone: (617) 373-7874
Twitter: @sjjphd

Listen to Sarah Jackson here:

Daina Ramey Berry

This week’s #NPRSource, Daina Ramey Berry, Ph.D., is an expert in African American History. She is an Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.  Her research focuses on slavery in the United States. Berry is a distinguished lecturer for the Organization of American Historians and the editor of the Gender and Slavery book series at the University of Georgia Press. She is working on publishing her book on a comprehensive study of the prices of the enslaved in the United States. She works in Austin, Texas.

Her research has been funded by The National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies, and the American Association of University Women.

daina-ramey-berry-photo16

Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas at Austin

Location: Austin, Texas

Contact Information:

Email: DRB@austin.utexas.edu

Phone: (512) 471-4310

Twitter: @lbofflesh

Listen to Daina Ramey Berry here:

 

Patricia Valoy

Patricia Valoy is a STEM advocate and feminist writer. She is an expert on feminism,gender stereotypes and workplace sexism. Valoy is also an engineer and writes on a variety of issues facing women of color in male-dominated, STEM careers. She currently serves as the STEM chairperson for the Women’s Information Network in New York. She is a writer and speaker for Soapbox Inc. and Everyday Feminism.

Patricia-Valoy

STEM advocate and Feminist writer 
Areas of Expertiese: Feminism, Gender Stereotypes and Workplace Sexism.
Location: Queens, NY
Contact Information: 
Twitter: @Besito86
Heard as a presenter for Women’s Funding Alliance on Seattle Channel’s Town Hall: “Breaking stereotypes in work, gender, and race” 

Ange-Marie Hancock

Ange-Marie Hancock is a tenured Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California. She is also CEO of RISIST, the Research Institute for the Study of Intersectionality and Social Transformation, a new online certification and collaboration platform that assists individuals and organizations to update their work in these two fields.

Hancock is a globally recognized scholar of intersectionality theory, the world’s leading analytical framework for analyzing and resolving inequality.  She has written three books on the intersectionality and its effect on policy, including the award-winning The Politics of Disgust and the Pubic Identity of the “Welfare Queen,” (2004, New York University Press), Solidarity Politics for Milennials: A Guide to Ending the Oppression Olympics (2011, Palgrave Macmillan) and the forthcoming Oxford University Press book Intersectionality: An Intellectual History, which be published in December 2015. In 1993, under the mentorship of NBA Hall of Famer Tom “Satch” Sanders, Hancock conducted the original survey research and designed the business model for the Women’s National Basketball Association.

AMH

Associate Professor of Political Science and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California

CEO of RISIST

Areas of Expertise: Politics, Gender and Sports, Feminism, Intersectionality

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Contact Information:

Phone: 213-740-6998

Email: ahancock@usc.edu

Twitter: @AngeMarieH

Website: RISIST.org

Heard on 89.3 KPCC’s Take Two: 3 leading female thinkers define that other ‘F-word’: Feminism 

Added November 2015

Last Verified: November 2015

Tressie McMillan Cottom

Tressie McMillan Cottom teaches sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is also an affiliated faculty at The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and contributing editor at Dissent magazine. Her current research focuses on inequalities in education, technology and work, which includes a study of for-profit colleges in the U.S., inequalities among “public intellectuals” and social media practices in institutions.

McMillan Cottom’s research aims to understand how inequalities manifest in the new economy and how those inequalities can be addressed. In addition to teaching and researching, she has advised academic, community and political organizations on matters of race/gender/class inequality, higher education and workforce development. McMillan Cottom also consults with universities and non-profit organizations on public scholarship, technology and organizational change.

Tressie McMillan Cottom
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Virginia Commonwealth University

Areas of Expertise: For-profit Higher Education, Digital Inequalities, Transition Points from Student to Worker

Location: Richmond, VA

Contact Information:
Email:
tmcottom@vcu.edu
Twitter: @tressiemcphd

Heard in Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society’s Luncheon Series:
Democratizing Ideologies and Inequality Regimes in Digital Domains

 

Syreeta McFadden

Syreeta McFadden writes a monthly column for the Guardian US and does freelance writing work. Her work is largely focused on gender, politics, race, culture and the arts, as well as the exploration of overlapping cultural narratives between communities. Her writing has appeared in The Nation, BuzzFeed, The Huffington Post, NPR, and others.

McFadden co-curates Poets in Unexpected Places (PUP), a collective of New York-based writers and language arts educators that stages surprise poetry performances in hopes of promoting community and dialogue in public. Previous PUP collaborations include the Juilliard School and Urban Word NYC. She is also the managing editor of the online literary magazine, Union Station, which features work from emerging writers in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, as well as photo essays and interviews.

She has appeared on NPR’s Tell Me More, WNYC’s On the Media, and Sirius XM Radio’s Make It Plain. A former urban planner, she holds degrees from Columbia University and Sarah Lawrence College, and is an adjunct professor of English at the Borough of Manhattan Community College.

Syreeta McFadden

Columnist for the Guardian US and Freelance Writer

Areas of Expertise: Visual Art (Photography/Technology), Literature (Poetry), Study of Feminism/Intersectionality

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: infosyreetamcfadden@gmail.com

Heard on WNYC’s On the Media: The Camera and the Color Line

Added June 2015