Leah Wright Rigueur

Leah Wright Rigueur is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is an expert on race and politics, modern African American history, U.S. political and social history, and riots, backlash and campus unrest. Rigueur has explored the dynamics of black Republican activists, officials and politicians as it relates to civil rights and conservatism in her latest book  The Loneliness of the Black Republican: Pragmatic Politics and the Pursuit of Power.  She has been featured on various news outlets including NPR’s All Things Considered.

GHP_5998 copy

Assistant Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government 

 Areas of expertise: Race and Politics, Modern African American History, U.S. Political and Social History, and Riots, Backlash and Campus Unrest

Location: Cambridge, MA

Contact Information:

Email:  Leah_WrightRigueur@hks.harvard.edulwrightphd@gmail.com

Phone: 617-495-1462

Twitter: @LeahRigueur 

Heard on NPR’s All Things ConsideredAt Critical Juncture, GOP Honors Largest Class Of Black Lawmakers

Rwany Sibaja

Rwany Sibaja (C-Bah-Ha) teaches modern Latin American history at Appalachian State University. The focus of his research centers on the impact and role of fútbol (soccer) on popular culture in mid-twentieth century Argentina, with a focus on the impact of fútbol on the formation and re-imagination of collective identities.

Sibaja is also the director of history at Appalachian State. His work has appeared in the journal Soccer & Society, the four-volume Sports Around the World: History, Culture, and Practice, and on Teachinghistory.org.

Rwany Sibaja

Assistant Professor of History and Director of History/Social Studies Education at Appalachian State University

Areas of Expertise: Soccer, 20th-century Argentina, Popular Culture, Social Studies Education

Location: Boone, NC

Contact Info:

Email: sibajaro@appstate.edu

Phone: 704-221-8264

Twitter: @rwanysibaja

Website: http://rwany.sibaja.net

Heard on NPR Source of the Week: Rwany Sibaja on FIFA Reform After Sepp Blatter’s Resignation

Marifeli Perez-Stable

Marifeli Perez-Stable is a Professor of Sociology at Florida International University, and writes a biweekly column for the Miami Herald on Latin American issues.

Perez-Stable is the former vice president for democratic governance at the Inter-American Dialogue in Washington, DC. In April 2003, she chaired the Task Force on Memory, Truth, and Justice which published the report, Cuban National Reconciliation. Perez-Stableis the director of “National Dialogues on Democracy in Latin America, a project sponsored by the Inter-American Dialogue with the cooperation of the Organization of American States.

She is currently working on Intimate Enemies, a book about the United States and Cuba after the Cold War.

perez stable

Professor of Sociology at Florida International University

Areas of Expertise: US-Cuba Relations, Sociology, Cuban Politics and History

Location: Miami, FL

Contact:

Phone: (305) 348-1296
Email: stablem@fiu.edu

Heard on NPR All Things Considered: In Miami, Praise For Honduran President’s Ouster

Added January 2015

Last Verified: January 2015

Maria Cristina Garcia

Maria Cristina Garcia is the Howard A. Newman Professor of American Studies at Cornell University. Her work focuses on refugees, immigration, exiles, and transnationals in the Americas. Her first book Havana USA: Cuban Exiles and Cuban Americans in South Florida, provides an in-depth look at the migration of Cubans to the United States after Fidel Castro took power in 1959.

Her more recent work Seeking Refuge: Central American Migration to Mexico, and the United States, and Canada, is, in her own words, “a study of the individuals, groups, and organizations that responded to the Central American refugee crisis of the 1980s and 1990s, and helped reshape refugee policies throughout North America.”

Garcia has appeared on NPR.

maria cristina garcia

Howard A. Newman Professor in American Studies at Cornell University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, U.S.-Cuban Relations, Latino U.S. History

Location: Ithaca, NY

Contact:

Phone: (607) 255-0469

Email: mcg20@cornell.edu

Heard on Morning Edition, ‘Young Migrants May Request Asylum, But It’s Hard To Get.’

\

Added January 2015

Last Verified: January 2015

 

Tiya Miles

Tiya Miles is chair of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies at the University of Michigan, where she is professor of history, American culture, Native American studies and women’s studies. Her work looking at the interrelationships between African and Cherokee people in colonial America earned her a 2011 MacArthur Foundation fellowship.

Miles has written two prize-winning books, Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom” and “The House on Diamond Hill: A Cherokee Plantation Story,” as well as numerous articles on women’s history and the black and Native interrelated experience. She has been a frequent guest on NPR’s Tell Me More.

Chair of the Department of Afroamerican and African Studies, Elsa Barkley Brown Collegiate Professor and Professor of History, American Culture, Native American Studies and Women’s Studies at University of Michigan

Areas of Expertise: History, American History, Native American Issues, African American Studies, Interrelationship Between Native Americans and African Americans, Women’s Issues

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Contact Info:

Email: tiya@umich.edu

Office: (734) 764-5513

Heard on NPR: For a full list, click here.

Tell Me More: Who Gets To Decide Who Is Native American?

Hua Hsu

Hua Hsu is an assistant professor of English and director of American Studies at Vassar College and a well-known culture critic. He began writing about film, music and sports as a graduate student at Harvard and has covered a wide range of cultural issues for Artforum, the Atlantic, New York magazine, the New York Times and Slate.

Hsu is an executive board member of the Asian American Writers Workshop. As of 2014, he is completing his first book, “A Floating Chinaman,” which looks at “the competing visions for a U.S.-China future that circulated in the popular novels and reportage of the interwar years–as well as the bizarre interpersonal rivalries these competing accounts inspired.”

Assistant Professor of English at Vassar College

Areas of Expertise: Culture Criticism, Sports, Music, Film, American Intellectual History, Transpacific Literary History, Cultural Studies

Location: Poughkeepsie, NY

Contact Info:

Email: huhsu@vassar.edu

Phone: (845) 437-5649

Twitter: @huahsu

Hsu discusses “How Writing Matters” for Vassar College

Karsonya Whitehead

Karsonya (Kaye) Wise Whitehead is an assistant professor of communication and African and African American studies at Loyola University Maryland. Her work focuses on the intersection of race, class and gender. An award-winning former Baltimore City middle school teacher, she has become a prominent, candid voice on race relations and African American culture.

In 2013, Whitehead was selected as one of four experts to present at President Obama’s first Black History Month panel at the White House. In addition to her academic work, she is an accomplished documentarian; her films “Twin Towers: A History” and “Life Lessons Learned in Last Place: The Zoe Koplowitz Story” were nominated for New York Emmys.


Assistant Professor of Communication and African and African American Studies, Loyola University Maryland

Areas of Expertise: Intersection of Race, Class and Gender; African American and African Culture; Race Relations; Working in Diverse Environments

Location: Baltimore, MD

Contact Information:
Email: 
kewhitehead@loyola.edu
Phone: (410) 716-8739
Twitter: @kayewhitehead

Heard on WEAA:

The Marc Steiner Show: Outcome Of The Shutdown | Implementing The Affordable Care Act

 

Frederick Douglass Opie

Frederick Douglass Opie is Professor of History and Foodways at Babson College and a blogger at Food As A Lens. His work focuses on the history of food traditions, cultures and systems, and how and why they have changed. His expertise has been cited in the Harvard Gazette and NPR, among other news outlets.

Opie is a frequent guest on the popular American Public Media show The Splendid Table, the television series Appetite City and in the documentary Soul Food Junkie. He is also the author of “Hog and Hominy: Soul Food from Africa to America,” “Black Labor Migration in Caribbean Guatemala and 1882-1923“ and the forthcoming book “Black and Latino Relation in New York 1959 to 1989.”

Frederick Opie

Professor of History and Foodways at Babson College

Areas of Expertise: Foodways, Campaigns, Food Movements

Location: Babson Park, MA

Contact Info:

Phone: (781) 239-5611
Email: fdopie@gmail.com
Twitter: @DrFredDOpie

Heard on NPR News and Notes: A Soul Food Journey From Africa To America

Jelani Cobb

Jelani Cobb is the Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at Columbia University. He was previously a history professor and director of the Institute of African American Studies at the University of Connecticut. He specializes in post-Civil War African American history, 20th century and modern American politics and the history of the Cold War. Cobb served as a delegate to the 2008 Democratic Convention and was selected as part of the Root 100 in 2013 — a listing of influential African American thinkers, artists, entrepreneurs and leaders.

He is a recipient of fellowships from the Fulbright and Ford Foundations. Cobb is the author of “The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama & the Paradox of Progress” and “To The Break of Dawn: A Freestyle on the Hip Hop Aesthetic,” which was a finalist for the National Award for Arts Writing. His collection “The Devil & Dave Chappelle and Other Essays” was published in 2007. Cobb’s forthcoming book is titled “Antidote to Revolution: African American Anticommunism and the Struggle for Civil Rights, 1931-1957.”

Cobb has contributed to a number of anthologies including In Defense of Mumia, Testimony, Mending the World and Beats, Rhymes and Life. He is a frequent contributor to NewYorker.com and his work has appeared in The New Republic, the Washington Post, the New York Times and Vibe magazine. He has also been a featured commentator on MSNBC, National Public Radio, CNN, Al-Jazeera, CBS News and a number of other national broadcast outlets.

Professor of Journalism, Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: African American Culture & History, Cold War History, 20th-Century American Politics, Contemporary Politics

Location: Hartford, CT

Contact info:

Office: 212-851-1809

Email: jelani.cobb@gmail.com

Featured on MSNBC:

Mae Ngai

Mae Ngai (nye) is a professor of history and Asian American studies at Columbia University. According to her bio, she was previously “a labor-union organizer and educator in New York City, working for District 65-UAW and the Consortium for Worker Education.” She has written about immigration for organizations such as The New York Times, The Nation, and the Boston Review.

Ngai is the author of two books, Impossible Subjects: Illegal Aliens and the Making of Modern America (2004) and The Lucky Ones: One Family and the Extraordinary Invention of Chinese America (2010).  She is also working on a third book, Yellow and Gold: The Chinese Mining Diaspora, 1848-1908.

 

Professor of History and Asian American Studies at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration History and Policy, Asian American Studies, U.S. Legal and Political History, Citizenship, Nationalism

Location: New York City


Contact Info:

Phone: (646) 438-1701

Email: mn53@columbia.edu

You can listen to Ngai speak about border security on CCTV: