Dean Seneca

Dean Seneca is CEO of Seneca Scientific Solutions, a consulting agency that provides tribal nations and other clients with assistance in economic and community development. The agency’s services include strategic planning, epidemiology and health research.

Seneca has been interviewed by Indian Country Today and Democracy Now!, among other news outlets, about how COVID-19 is impacting Indian Country. 

With over 20 years of experience with infectious disease outbreaks, Seneca has worked to combat Anthrax, H1N1, Ebola, Zika and COVID-19. Seneca was previously a senior health scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Center for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support, where he was responsible for building the CDC’s ability to support health departments across the country.

Prior to his time at the CDC, Seneca was the tribal planning director for the Seneca Nation of Indians, which is based in western New York.

Dean Seneca_podium

Location: Cattaraugus, N.Y.

Expertise: Chronic and infectious diseases, emergency preparedness and response, environmental health, toxicology and maternal/child health, American Indian/Alaska Native health

Contact info:

Phone number: (678) 524-5177

Email: thundereagle1042@gmail.com 

Listen to Dean Seneca on Democracy Now!:

Last updated: May 17, 2020

Manley Begay

Navajo Nation citizen Manley Begay is an expert in tribal economic development and indigenous governance. He is the faculty chair of the Native Nations Institute at the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Senior Lecturer in the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Arizona.

He serves as co-director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, as well as on a number of national boards focusing on Native American development and wellness.

Begay’s research focuses on Native American education, tribal governance and law. His work has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Manley Begay

Senior Lecturer of American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona

Areas of Expertise: Tribal Economic Development, Educational Leadership, Indigenous Governance, Native American Issues

Location: Tucson, AZ

Contact Information:

Email: mbegay@email.arizona.edu
Phone: (520) 626-8629

Heard at the Native Nations Institute: Rebuilding Native Nations: “The Importance of Cultural Match”

Added February 2015

Mark Trahant

Columnist Mark Trahant has over 30 years of experience in journalism, editing and reporting on a wide range of topics, as well as specializing in Indian Country news. He’s a former President of the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA), and is the Atwood Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Anchorage.

In the past he’s been the Chairman of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, a columnist for The Seattle Times, an editor and publisher at the Moscow-Pullman Daily News, an executive news editor at The Salt Lake Tribune, and a reporter at the Arizona Republic. He was a Kaiser Media Fellow in 2009 and 2010, writing about health care reform focused on existing programs such as the Indian Health Service (IHS).

His work recently appeared on the PBS series Frontline, in a story called “The Silence”, about sexual abuse by clergy in Alaska. He also keeps a blog at trahantreports.org.

Trahant is a citizen of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes.

Mark Trahant

Columnist and Atwood Chair of Journalism at the University of Alaska Anchorage

Areas of Expertise: Native American & Alaska Native news and policy, Health Policy, Affordable Care Act in Indian Country, Journalism

Location:Fort Hall, ID

Contact Information:

Phone: (206) 200-8213
Email: mntrahant@mac.com

Heard on NPR’s Talk of the Nation: Do Border Fences Curb Illegal Crossings?

Added September 2014