An Xiao Mina

An Xiao Mina works on program strategy and operations at Meedan, a technology non-profit that builds software for newsrooms and NGOs to improve the quality of information online. She’s an expert on digital creative culture and how memes influence protest movements and politics.

Internet memes have gone from silly image macros to salvos in cultural and political struggles. And that trend continues with the ongoing movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — see the memeification of arresting the cops who killed Breonna Taylor or the widespread use of Karen as a negative term for a privileged and racist white woman.

As the author of the 2019 book Memes to Movements: How the World’s Most Viral Media is Changing Social Protest and Power, Mina can provide context on the ways internet memes are shaping pop culture, politics, protest and propaganda.

Before joining Meedan, Mina was a research fellow at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet and Society and a 2016 Knight Visiting Fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism. She’s the co-author of the upcoming Hanmoji Handbook, which uses emojis to teach Mandarin Chinese, and her work has appeared in The Atlantic, Foreign Policy and Hyperallergenic.

Mina has worked with The Civic Beat and China Residencies to create workshops and art exhibitions in spaces including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Museum of the Moving Image in New York City and the Center for Media at Risk at the University of Pennsylvania.

Credit Jan Chipchase/Studio D Radiodurans (©)

Expertise: Digital creative culture, how memes influence protest movements and politics

Contact information:

Email: anxiaomina-berkman@protonmail.com 

Listen to An Xiao Mina speaking at the Data & Society Research Institute:

Last updated July 14, 2020

Nat Gyenes

Nat Gyenes is a researcher who focuses on the intersection of the internet and public health. She leads the Digital Health Lab at Meedan, a technology nonprofit, and studies health and technology as a research affiliate at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society

Gyenes has looked at how epidemics, prolonged public health challenges and digital health misinformation affect societies. She co-wrote an article for The Atlantic which explains the growing challenge of digital health misinformation and how falsehoods online fueled the spread of tooth decay, Ebola and measles.

She was quoted by NBC News urging public health authorities to use social media to address health rumors and myths that circulate  online. And she told CNBC that health misinformation online can reduce compliance with health treatments and prevention efforts.

Expertise: health systems, access to information, science communications, technology, misinformation, public health 

Contact Information: 

Email: nat@meedan.com

Twitter: @GyenesNat

Listen to Nat Gyenes give a presentation at Intrahealth International:

Last Updated: March 16, 2020

Tim Wu

Tim Wu is a Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. Wu joined the Law School in 2006 and teaches antitrust, copyright, the media industries, and communications law.  He is the author of, among other works, Network Neutrality Broadband Discrimination (2003), Who Controls the Internet (2006), The Master Switch (2010), and The Attention Merchants (2016). Wu is known for having coined the term “net neutrality”.

Wu was a law clerk for Justice Stephen Breyer and Judge Richard Posner, and has also worked at the White House National Economic Council, at the Federal Trade Commission, for the New York Attorney General, and in the Silicon Valley telecommunications industry.

Tim Wu
Professor of Law, Columbia University School of Law

Location: New York, New York

Contact Information:
Email: twu@law.columbia.edu | wu@pobox.com
Phone: (415) 690-0688

As Heard On Fresh Air: “How Free Web Content Traps People In An Abyss Of Ads And Clickbait”

Enrique Armijo

Enrique Armijo is an Associate professor of Law at Elon University in Greensboro, North Carolina. He is also an affiliate fellow of the Yale Law School Information Society Project. Armijo is an expert on the media and internet law, the First Amendment, and international freedom of expression.

He has advised government officials, leaders and NGO’s in various countries on matters of media and internet law. The Federal Communications and Federal Election Commission have referred to Armijo’s work for rulemaking proceedings. He is now exploring the connection between freedom of speech and new technologies. He has contributed his expertise to numerous news organizations including WNYC’s ‘On the Media’, heard here.


Associate Professor of Law, Elon University

Areas of expertise: Media and Internet Law, The First Amendment and International Freedom of Expression.

Location: Greensboro, NC

Contact Information:
Email: earmijo@elon.edu
Twitter: @e_armijo

 

Arun Sundararajan

Arun Sundararajan serves as Professor and the Robert L. and Dale Atkins Rosen Faculty Fellow at New York University’s Leonard N. Stern School of Business. He is also an affiliated faculty member at NYU’s Center for Urban Science+Progress, and at NYU’s Center for Data Science.

Sundararajan’s research program studies how digital technologies transform business and society. His current research focuses on crowd-based capitalism, which he believes will evolve into a dominant model of organizing economic activity in the 21st century, altering how we consume, what it means to have a job, the nature of regulation, and the basis for trust in society. Sundararajan has provided expert input about the digital economy as part of Congressional testimony and to a variety of city, state and federal government agencies. His op-eds and expert commentary have appeared in print publications like the New Yorker, the New York Times and Harvard Business Review, as well as a variety of radio shows and TV programs.

Professor of Information, Operations and Management Sciences at New York University

Areas of Expertise: All Things Digital, The Sharing Economy, The Future Of Work, Tech In Emerging Markets, and Online Privacy

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: digitalarun@nyu.edu
Twitter: @digitalarun

Heard on NPR’s All Tech Considered: Apps That Share, Or Scalp, Public Parking Spots

Added January 2016

 

Khaliah Barnes

Khaliah Barnes is associate director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) and director of the EPIC Student Privacy Project. EPIC works to protect privacy, freedom of expression, democratic values, and to promote the public voice in decisions concerning the future of the Internet.

Barnes works on a host of privacy issues and has submitted comments in over forty federal agency rulemakings and similar agency proceedings concerning the Privacy Act, the U.S. – EU Safe Harbor Framework, information security, air traveler rights, student privacy, consumer rights, automotive privacy, drones and domestic surveillance, medical privacy, and the Freedom of Information Act. As Director of the EPIC Student Privacy Project, Barnes created the Student Privacy Bill of Rights, defending student privacy rights before federal regulatory agencies and federal court.

A frequent commentator on student data collection, Barnes has provided expert commentary to CBS This Morning, the New York Times and the Washington Post, among other outlets. She is also a lawyer, and will teach “Information Privacy Law” at Georgetown Law in 2016.

Khaliah Barnes
Associate Director of EPIC and Director of the EPIC Student Privacy Project

Areas of Expertise: Student Privacy, Consumer Privacy, Car Privacy, Drones and Domestic Surveillance, Government Databases, Privacy Act

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: barnes@epic.org
Phone: (202) 483-1140 ext. 107

Heard on NPR’s Talk of the Nation: Tracking Privacy And Ownership In An Online World

Added July 2015

Rey Junco

Rey Junco (HOON-koh) is a faculty associate at Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet and Society. He researches how youth interact with social media and technology and how this affects development, engagement, and learning.

Junco’s most recent studies include “Comparing actual and self-reported measures of Facebook use” and “In-class multitasking and academic performance.” He has been on Tell Me More discussing kids’ online privacy and teenagers who post racist tweets.

Junco holds a doctorate in counselor education and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Penn State University. He blogs at Social Media in Higher Education.

Associate Professor of Library Science in the Purdue University Libraries, Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University

Areas of Expertise: Social Media, Youth and Media, Higher Education, Clinical Psychology, Library Sciences

Location: West Lafayette, IN


Contact Info:

Phone: (814) 441-0339

Email:rjunco@cyber.law.harvard.edu

Twitter: @reyjunco

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: Keeping Up With Kids’ Online Privacy