Kimberly TallBear

Kim TallBear is an Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta in Canada and Research Chair in its department of Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Environment. An enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribe in South Dakota, her research focuses on the relationship between science and race/identity among Native American peoples.

TallBear’s most recent book, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science, examines the scientific premise behind Native Americans’ ownership (or former ownership) of lands and natural resources. She has traveled to the United States, Canada and United Kingdom to share her commentary on issues related to indigenous peoples, science and technology.

Associate Professor of Native Studies and Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta

Location: Edmonton, Canada

Areas of Expertise: Indigenous peoples, environmental science, genetics, native studies, sexuality, race/identity

Contact Information

E-mail: tallbear@ualberta.ca

Listen to Kim TallBear here:

Dina Gilio-Walker

Dina Gilio-Walker is Policy Director and Senior Research Associate at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. A member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, her research interests include political autonomy among indigenous nations and the complex relationship between Native American communities and  modern America. Additionally, she has completed research in critical sports studies, specifically as it relates to the intersection of indigenous culture and the sport of surfing.

Walker’s latest book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans examines the most commonly-held myths and commonly-held beliefs about Native American culture and history. She is a frequent contributor to the Indian Country Media Network and her commentary has been featured by a number of news outlets including the Boston Globe, Mic.com and CSPAN Book Talk.

Whitaker
Policy Director and Senior Research Associate, Center for World Indigenous Studies

Location: San Clemente, CA

Areas of Expertise: Native American culture, critical sports studies, indigenous peoples, surfing, Native American history, higher education

Contact Information:
E-mail:
dinagwhitaker@gmail.com
Phone: (949) 612-5276
Twitter: @DinaGWhit

Ted Van Alst

Ted Van Alst is assistant professor of Native American Studies at the University of Montana. Previously, he spent four years as an assistant dean at Yale College and served as director of the Yale University Native American Cultural Center. He is a widely-read author whose work includes two chapters (“Navajo Joe” and “The Savage Innocents”) in the 2013 book “Seeing Red—Hollywood’s Pixeled Skins: American Indians and Film.”

Van Alst has been heard on NPR’s Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Sunday, and has been featured in the Washington Post, Canadian Broadcast Corporation, Native American Calling, Smithsonian Magazine and Al Jazeera America for his expertise in Native American culture.


Assistant Professor of Native American Studies at the University of Montana

Areas of Expertise: Native American History and Culture

Location: Missoula, Montana

Contact Information:
Email:
ted.vanalst@mso.umt.edu

Heard on Canadian Broadcast Corporation:

First Nations appropriation

 

Patty Loew

Patty Loew is a journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University. As a member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she focuses primarily on indigenous rights, sovereignty and the role of Native media.

Loew is a former broadcast journalist and has produced numerous documentaries and pieces for public and commercial television examining Native issues and culture. Her award-winning documentary Way of the Warrior premiered nationally on PBS in 2007.


Journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University

Areas of Expertise: Ojibwe Treaty Rights, Indigenous Sovereignty, Role of Native Media in Communication Indigenous World Views, Social Media, Indigenous Cultural Expression

Location: Evanston, IL

Contact Information:
Email: patricia.loew@northwestern.edu
Phone: 847-491-4837

Heard on WUWM: The Lake Effect: “Professor: State Will ‘Drive a Wedge’ Between Indian Nations Over Casino”

Last updated August 12, 2020