Holly Guise

 Dr. Holly Miowak Guise is an assistant professor of history at the University of New Mexico. An Iñupiaq Alaska Native, she is an expert in Indigenous U.S. history (with a focus on World War II-era Alaskan history) and the growing movement within modern day Indigenous activists called Rematriation, the practice of returning ideas, things and practices to their original, natural context as a form of cultural healing.

Guise has been working on a digital humanities project that features oral histories from Native elders, veterans and Unangan internment survivors. In 2008, she began traveling throughout Alaska to interview dozens of veterans to uncover forgotten or overlooked aspects of WWII history. In 2013, she pivoted to interviewing Alaska Native elders about their memories of WWII-era Alaska as service members, civilians and children. 

The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development named Guise one of its “40 Under 40” Native leaders making significant impacts within their communities. 

You can listen to Dr. Guise speak here.

Courtesy of Dr. Holly Guise

Professor of History, University of New Mexico

Expertise Fields: Indigenous American history, World War II Pacific history, Alaska history, segregation, race and ethnicity, Native relocation and internment camps, Native women’s history, and Indigenous military service during WWII, Alaska Native activist Elizabeth Peratrovich

Based in: Albuquerque, NM

Contact Info:

Email: hguise@unm.edu 
Phone: 505-277-2451
Twitter: @hollyguise 

Added February 2021.

Kimberly TallBear

Kim TallBear is an Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta in Canada and Research Chair in its department of Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Environment. An enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribe in South Dakota, her research focuses on the relationship between science and race/identity among Native American peoples.

TallBear’s most recent book, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science, examines the scientific premise behind Native Americans’ ownership (or former ownership) of lands and natural resources. She has traveled to the United States, Canada and United Kingdom to share her commentary on issues related to indigenous peoples, science and technology.

Associate Professor of Native Studies and Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta

Location: Edmonton, Canada

Areas of Expertise: Indigenous peoples, environmental science, genetics, native studies, sexuality, race/identity

Contact Information

E-mail: tallbear@ualberta.ca

Listen to Kim TallBear here:

Dina Gilio-Walker

Dina Gilio-Walker is Policy Director and Senior Research Associate at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. A member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, her research interests include political autonomy among indigenous nations and the complex relationship between Native American communities and  modern America. Additionally, she has completed research in critical sports studies, specifically as it relates to the intersection of indigenous culture and the sport of surfing.

Walker’s latest book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans examines the most commonly-held myths and commonly-held beliefs about Native American culture and history. She is a frequent contributor to the Indian Country Media Network and her commentary has been featured by a number of news outlets including the Boston Globe, Mic.com and CSPAN Book Talk.

Whitaker
Policy Director and Senior Research Associate, Center for World Indigenous Studies

Location: San Clemente, CA

Areas of Expertise: Native American culture, critical sports studies, indigenous peoples, surfing, Native American history, higher education

Contact Information:
E-mail:
dinagwhitaker@gmail.com
Phone: (949) 612-5276
Twitter: @DinaGWhit

Dennis Smith

Dennis Smith is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he primarily teaches Native American History. His research focuses on the cultures of Assiniboine and Sioux Plains Tribes as well as the salmon traditions of Pacific Northwest Native American and British Columbia First Nations tribes. His most extensive research has been on the oral traditions of the Dakota and Assiniboine tribes. He is of Assiniboine descent.

Smith is currently in the process of publishing a book consisting of a series of historical essays with a focus on the cultures of Dakota and Assiniboine tribal leaders, to be published in May 2018. The essays are intended to place their experiences in a modern context, specifically as it relates to current developments at Standing Rock. His goal, he says, is to advance the knowledge and teaching of Native American history in both society and Higher Education.

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Associate Professor of History, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Location: Omaha, Nebraska

Areas of Expertise: Native American History, American History, Native American Oral Traditions, Standing Rock, Assiniboine Tribe, Dakota Tribe,  Higher Education

Contact Information:

E-mail: dennissmith@unomaha.edu
Phone: (712) 204-1822