Matthew Fletcher

Matthew L.M. Fletcher is a Professor of Law at Michigan State University College of Law, and Director of the Indigenous Law and Policy Center. He is the primary editor and author of the leading law blog on American Indian law and policy, Turtle Talk.

In addition to his academic work, he is an appellate judge for the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court of Appeals, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Appellate Court, the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Tribal Court of Appeals, and the Chief Appellate Judge for the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Supreme Court.

Fletcher specializes in a number of areas of law, especially pertaining to federal law and Indian Tribes, Indian law and policy, and has written a number of scholarly papers. He has authored several books; American Indian Education: Counternarratives in Racism, Struggle, and the Law; American Indian Tribal Law; and edited Facing the Future: the Indian Child Welfare Act at 30.

Fletcher is a citizen of the Grand Traverse Band, located in Peshawbestown, Michigan.

He has appeared on Wyoming Public Radio, and The Fronteras Changing America Desk.

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Michigan State University College of Law Professor, and Director of the Indigenous Law & Policy Center

Areas of Expertise: Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), Federal Law, Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, Indian Law & Policy, Land Claims, Tribal Indian Gaming

Location: East Lansing, MI

Contact Information:

Email: matthew.fletcher@law.msu.edu

Phone: (517) 432-6909

Heard on The Fronteras Desk SCOTUS Rules On Native American Child Custody

Kimberly TallBear

Kim TallBear is an Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta in Canada and Research Chair in its department of Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Environment. An enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribe in South Dakota, her research focuses on the relationship between science and race/identity among Native American peoples.

TallBear’s most recent book, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science, examines the scientific premise behind Native Americans’ ownership (or former ownership) of lands and natural resources. She has traveled to the United States, Canada and United Kingdom to share her commentary on issues related to indigenous peoples, science and technology.

Associate Professor of Native Studies and Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta

Location: Edmonton, Canada

Areas of Expertise: Indigenous peoples, environmental science, genetics, native studies, sexuality, race/identity

Contact Information

E-mail: tallbear@ualberta.ca

Listen to Kim TallBear here:

Dina Gilio-Walker

Dina Gilio-Walker is Policy Director and Senior Research Associate at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. A member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, her research interests include political autonomy among indigenous nations and the complex relationship between Native American communities and  modern America. Additionally, she has completed research in critical sports studies, specifically as it relates to the intersection of indigenous culture and the sport of surfing.

Walker’s latest book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans examines the most commonly-held myths and commonly-held beliefs about Native American culture and history. She is a frequent contributor to the Indian Country Media Network and her commentary has been featured by a number of news outlets including the Boston Globe, Mic.com and CSPAN Book Talk.

Whitaker
Policy Director and Senior Research Associate, Center for World Indigenous Studies

Location: San Clemente, CA

Areas of Expertise: Native American culture, critical sports studies, indigenous peoples, surfing, Native American history, higher education

Contact Information:
E-mail:
dinagwhitaker@gmail.com
Phone: (949) 612-5276
Twitter: @DinaGWhit

Dennis Smith

Dennis Smith is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where he primarily teaches Native American History. His research focuses on the cultures of Assiniboine and Sioux Plains Tribes as well as the salmon traditions of Pacific Northwest Native American and British Columbia First Nations tribes. His most extensive research has been on the oral traditions of the Dakota and Assiniboine tribes. He is of Assiniboine descent.

Smith is currently in the process of publishing a book consisting of a series of historical essays with a focus on the cultures of Dakota and Assiniboine tribal leaders, to be published in May 2018. The essays are intended to place their experiences in a modern context, specifically as it relates to current developments at Standing Rock. His goal, he says, is to advance the knowledge and teaching of Native American history in both society and Higher Education.

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Associate Professor of History, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Location: Omaha, Nebraska

Areas of Expertise: Native American History, American History, Native American Oral Traditions, Standing Rock, Assiniboine Tribe, Dakota Tribe,  Higher Education

Contact Information:

E-mail: dennissmith@unomaha.edu
Phone: (712) 204-1822

Manley Begay

Navajo Nation citizen Manley Begay is an expert in tribal economic development and indigenous governance. He is the faculty chair of the Native Nations Institute at the Udall Center for Studies in Public Policy and Senior Lecturer in the American Indian Studies Program at the University of Arizona.

He serves as co-director of the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, as well as on a number of national boards focusing on Native American development and wellness.

Begay’s research focuses on Native American education, tribal governance and law. His work has appeared in The New York Times and The Washington Post.

Manley Begay

Senior Lecturer of American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona

Areas of Expertise: Tribal Economic Development, Educational Leadership, Indigenous Governance, Native American Issues

Location: Tucson, AZ

Contact Information:

Email: mbegay@email.arizona.edu
Phone: (520) 626-8629

Heard at the Native Nations Institute: Rebuilding Native Nations: “The Importance of Cultural Match”

Added February 2015

Patty Loew

Patty Loew is a journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University. As a member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she focuses primarily on indigenous rights, sovereignty and the role of Native media.

Loew is a former broadcast journalist and has produced numerous documentaries and pieces for public and commercial television examining Native issues and culture. Her award-winning documentary Way of the Warrior premiered nationally on PBS in 2007.


Journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University

Areas of Expertise: Ojibwe Treaty Rights, Indigenous Sovereignty, Role of Native Media in Communication Indigenous World Views, Social Media, Indigenous Cultural Expression

Location: Evanston, IL

Contact Information:
Email: patricia.loew@northwestern.edu
Phone: 847-491-4837

Heard on WUWM: The Lake Effect: “Professor: State Will ‘Drive a Wedge’ Between Indian Nations Over Casino”

Last updated August 12, 2020

Jacqueline Pata

Jacqueline Pata is executive director of the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI), the oldest tribal government organization in the United States. She previously served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Native American Programs at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development where she worked to provide affordable housing for Native Americans.

Pata is a member of the Raven/Sockeye clan of the Tlingit (KLING-get) Tribe and the Central Council of the Tlingit-Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska.


Executive Director, National Congress of American Indians (NCAI)

Areas of Expertise: Native American Issues, Tribal Government, Homeownership & Housing Policy

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:

For interviews and media opportunities, please contact Thom Wallace, the NCAI Communications Director:

Office: (202) 466-7767 ext.207

Mobile: (202) 630-1094

Email: twallace@ncai.org

Jacqueline’s Email: jpata@ncai.org

Twitter: @NCAI1944 

Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: The State of Indian Country: Global Tribes?