Holly Guise

 Dr. Holly Miowak Guise is an assistant professor of history at the University of New Mexico. An Iñupiaq Alaska Native, she is an expert in Indigenous U.S. history (with a focus on World War II-era Alaskan history) and the growing movement within modern day Indigenous activists called Rematriation, the practice of returning ideas, things and practices to their original, natural context as a form of cultural healing.

Guise has been working on a digital humanities project that features oral histories from Native elders, veterans and Unangan internment survivors. In 2008, she began traveling throughout Alaska to interview dozens of veterans to uncover forgotten or overlooked aspects of WWII history. In 2013, she pivoted to interviewing Alaska Native elders about their memories of WWII-era Alaska as service members, civilians and children. 

The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development named Guise one of its “40 Under 40” Native leaders making significant impacts within their communities. 

You can listen to Dr. Guise speak here.

Courtesy of Dr. Holly Guise

Professor of History, University of New Mexico

Expertise Fields: Indigenous American history, World War II Pacific history, Alaska history, segregation, race and ethnicity, Native relocation and internment camps, Native women’s history, and Indigenous military service during WWII, Alaska Native activist Elizabeth Peratrovich

Based in: Albuquerque, NM

Contact Info:

Email: hguise@unm.edu 
Phone: 505-277-2451
Twitter: @hollyguise 

Added February 2021.

Carla Fredericks

Carla Fredericks is the director of the American Indian Law Clinic at the University of Colorado Law School and of the indigenous advocacy organization First Peoples Worldwide. She’s an expert on Native American law, rights and tribal sovereignty.

As part of the broader movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — and after years of resistance — Washington’s NFL team is finally considering a name change following pressure from corporate sponsors like FedEx.

But Fredericks says that’s not the whole story: FedEx did not turn on a dime. Instead, native activists have been pressuring investors and business partners of the NFL team for more than a decade. And the push isn’t over — the Cleveland Indians are also considering a name change, while the Atlanta Braves are not.

Fredericks can provide context on the long campaign by Native activists to change the name of the D.C. team and how Native Americans and the fight for tribal sovereignty fit into the broader movement for racial justice.

Before joining the University of Colorado, Fredericks was a partner at Milberg LLP in New York. She maintains a pro bono practice, and provided legal counsel to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe during and after the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

She’s also published many studies and papers including Social Cost and Material Loss: The Dakota Access Pipeline, which found that backers lost at least $12 billion due to the legal battles and controversy surrounding the project.

Fredericks is an enrolled citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation of North Dakota.

Location: Boulder, CO

Expertise: Native American law, rights and sovereignty

Contact information:

Email: Carla.Fredericks@Colorado.EDU 

Phone: (303) 492-7079

Listen to Carla Fredericks on Colorado Public Radio:

Last updated July 9, 2020

Sarah Deer

2014 MacArthur Fellow and Professor of Law Sarah Deer, studies domestic and sexual violence on reservations. She is a board member of the American Bar Association’s commission on Domestic Violence, the National Alliance to end Sexual Violence, and was a Federal Advisory Committee chair for the National Coordination Committee on the American Indian/Alaska Native Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner- Sexual Assault Response Team Initiative. Deer is a citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation.

Deer has specialized in victim rights and advocacy,and authored an Amnesty International report titled “Maze of Injustice:The failure to protect Indigenous women from sexual violence in the USA.” For 15 years, she advised for reform to the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) that passed in 2013, which allows tribes to press charges against non-tribal members who inflict violence against native women while on tribal land.

Deer has discussed domestic violence on reservations and VAWA in reports by Laura Sullivan and Hansi Lo Wang. She has also been on Minnesota Public Radio, PRI’s The World, Al Jazeera and MSNBC.

Sarah Deer

Assistant Professor at the William Mitchell College of Law
Areas of Expertise: Tribal Law, Domestic Assault and Sexual Violence, Victim Rights, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA)

Location: Saint Paul, MN

Contact Information:
Email: sarah.deer@wmitchell.edu
Phone: (651) 290-6309

To schedule an interview, contact
Lynette Fraction: (651) 290-6431
Steve Linders: (651) 290-6360

Featured on PRI’s The World: How Borders Affect Native American Women’s Rights

Added September 2014