Carla Fredericks

Carla Fredericks is the director of the American Indian Law Clinic at the University of Colorado Law School and of the indigenous advocacy organization First Peoples Worldwide. She’s an expert on Native American law, rights and tribal sovereignty.

As part of the broader movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — and after years of resistance — Washington’s NFL team is finally considering a name change following pressure from corporate sponsors like FedEx.

But Fredericks says that’s not the whole story: FedEx did not turn on a dime. Instead, native activists have been pressuring investors and business partners of the NFL team for more than a decade. And the push isn’t over — the Cleveland Indians are also considering a name change, while the Atlanta Braves are not.

Fredericks can provide context on the long campaign by Native activists to change the name of the D.C. team and how Native Americans and the fight for tribal sovereignty fit into the broader movement for racial justice.

Before joining the University of Colorado, Fredericks was a partner at Milberg LLP in New York. She maintains a pro bono practice, and provided legal counsel to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe during and after the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

She’s also published many studies and papers including Social Cost and Material Loss: The Dakota Access Pipeline, which found that backers lost at least $12 billion due to the legal battles and controversy surrounding the project.

Fredericks is an enrolled citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation of North Dakota.

Location: Boulder, CO

Expertise: Native American law, rights and sovereignty

Contact information:

Email: Carla.Fredericks@Colorado.EDU 

Phone: (303) 492-7079

Listen to Carla Fredericks on Colorado Public Radio:

Last updated July 9, 2020

Ted Van Alst

Ted Van Alst is assistant professor of Native American Studies at the University of Montana. Previously, he spent four years as an assistant dean at Yale College and served as director of the Yale University Native American Cultural Center. He is a widely-read author whose work includes two chapters (“Navajo Joe” and “The Savage Innocents”) in the 2013 book “Seeing Red—Hollywood’s Pixeled Skins: American Indians and Film.”

Van Alst has been heard on NPR’s Morning Edition and Weekend Edition Sunday, and has been featured in the Washington Post, Canadian Broadcast Corporation, Native American Calling, Smithsonian Magazine and Al Jazeera America for his expertise in Native American culture.


Assistant Professor of Native American Studies at the University of Montana

Areas of Expertise: Native American History and Culture

Location: Missoula, Montana

Contact Information:
Email:
ted.vanalst@mso.umt.edu

Heard on Canadian Broadcast Corporation:

First Nations appropriation