Christen A. Smith

Dr. Christen A. Smith is an associate professor of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies and the director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She’s an expert on Black liberation and state violence against Black communities in the Americas.

Smith can provide context on the anthropological background of police violence against Black communities. Her recent research examines the lingering and deadly impacts of police violence on Black women, communities and families in the U.S. and Brazil.

Her 2016 book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil explores the ironic relationship between police violence against Black Brazilians in Salvador, Bahia and the celebration and consumption of Black culture, music and art.

Smith is also the founder of Cite Black Women, which promotes the intellectual and academic work of Black women — historically overlooked and undervalued. Through a blog, podcast and social media campaign, the project pushes people to reexamine their blind spots on race and gender and start using and citing the work of Black female sources.

Location: Austin, TX

Expertise: Black liberation, resistance and state violence against Black communities in the Americas

Contact information:

Email: christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @profsassy

Listen to Christen A. Smith on KQED’s World Affairs:

Last updated July 22, 2020

Elizabeth OuYang

Elizabeth OuYang has been a civil rights attorney and advocate for the past 30 years. She is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights and New York University’s College of Arts and Science. Her areas of expertise include voting, immigration, media accountability, and combating hate crimes and police brutality.

OuYang’s cases and advocacy have been covered extensively in national and local media. Among her many notable clients include Private Danny Chen, a 19-year-old solider found dead in Afghanistan after weeks of racial mistreatment and hazing by his superiors. One of her more recent cases involved Mohammad Sarfaraz Hussain, a 19-year-old who faced removal from the U.S. in 2003 after complying with the special registration program targeting Arabs, Muslims and South Asians. He was granted citizenship in 2016. In 2000, she was appointed by president Bill Clinton to serve as a special assistant to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.

Civil Rights Attorney and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights & New York University’s College of Arts and Sciences

Location: New York, New York

Areas of Expertise: Voting, Immigration, Media Accountability, Hate crimes and Police Brutality + Race, Sex, and Disability Discrimination

Contact Information:

E-mail: lizouyang@aol.com
Phone: (718) 650-1960

Kristen Clarke

Kristen Clarke is president and executive director of the National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. In this capacity she is a legal advocate on behalf of the rights of communities of color, especially in the areas of social justice, equal economic opportunity, criminal justice and judicial diversity, among others.

Before joining the Lawyers’ Committee, Clarke spent several years at the NAACP’s Legal Defense and Educational Fund where she helped lead the organization’s efforts in voting rights and election law reform across the country. Before joining the LDF, she worked at the U.S. Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division, where she served as a federal prosecutor, handling cases of police brutality, hate crimes, and human trafficking. Clarke is a regular contributor to a number of outlets including CNN, MSNBC and TV One as well as a 2017 recipient of Quinnipiac University’s Thurgood Marshall Award, among others.

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President and Executive Director, National Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Areas of Expertise: Criminal justice, police brutality, civil liberties, hate speech, civil litigation, diversity

Location: Washington, D.C.

Contact Info:
Email: DRobinson@LawyersCommittee.org
Twitter: @KristenClarkeJD

Phillip Atiba Goff

Phillip Atiba Goff teaches social psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, and is co-founder and president for research of the Center for Policing Equity. His work focuses on racial bias, discrimination and the intersections of race and gender.

Goff’s approach to bias explores the ways in which racial prejudice is not necessarily a precondition for racial discrimination; he looks at the contextual factors that can produce racial inequity. He is the youngest member of the John Jay College of Criminal Justice advisory board for the Center on Race, Crime and Justice and has served as an expert witness in several high-profile cases. He has been recognized as a national leader in race and gender discrimination as well as an emerging leader in research on race, gender and policing.

Goff has appeared on MSNBC and NPR’s All Things Considered, as well as in the LA Times and on HuffingtonPost.com.

Phillip Atiba Goff

Assistant Professor of Social Psychology at University of California, Los Angeles

Areas of Expertise: Racial Bias, Discrimination, Intersections of Race and Gender, Crime and Justice, School-to-Prison Pipeline, Law Enforcement, Racial Profiling, Racial Anxiety, Gun Control, Policing, Prejudice, Microaggression, Black Male Achievement, Implicit Bias

Location: Los Angeles, CA

Contact Information:

Safiya Jafari Simmons, Values Partnerships
Phone: (301) 237-2648
Email: safiya@valuespartnerships.com

Heard on NPR: For a full list, click here.
All Things Considered: Legalese Aside, How Do We Talk About Race Nowadays?