Cecily Hardaway

Cecily Hardaway researches at Duke University’s Social Science Research Institute. Hardaway’s primary line of research investigates links between poverty-related risks (e.g., exposure to community violence, economic hardship, and household chaos) and adolescents’ socioemotional adjustment and academic achievement. She is particularly interested in identifying processes that help us understand why poverty-related risks are, in fact, risks and pinpointing ways that low-income adolescents may be protected from these risks.

Her most recent work has focused on how exposure to community violence is associated with low-income adolescents’ mental health and behavior as well as identifying factors within the family and community that help protect adolescents from the consequences of exposure to community violence. Hardaway’s research has been published in psychology, family studies, and child/adolescent development journals, including the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, the American Journal of Community Psychology, and the Psychology of Violence.

Cecily Hardaway

Research Scientist at Duke University’s Social Science Research Institute

Areas of Expertise: Exposure to Community Violence, Poverty, Adolescent Development, Family Processes, Low-Income Families

Location: Durham, NC

Contact Information:

Email: cecily.hardaway@duke.edu

Heard on Source of the Week: Cecily Hardaway Discussing Exposure To Community Violence

Added September 2015

Last Verified: September 2015

Margaret Simms

Margaret Simms is an Institute fellow in the Center on Labor, Human Services, and Population at the Urban Institute, where she directs the Low-Income Working Families project. A nationally recognized expert on the economic well-being of African Americans, her current work focuses on low-income families, with an emphasis on employment and asset building.

Before joining Urban in 2007, Simms was vice president for governance and economic analysis at the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies. In 2005, Simms was elected to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences; in 2008, she received the Samuel Z. Westerfield Award from the National Economic Association. She was awarded an honorary doctor of laws degree from Carleton College, Minnesota, in 2010.

Simms holds a BA in economics from Carleton College and a PhD in economics from Stanford University.
Margaret Simms
Director of the Low-Income Working Families Institute, The Urban Institute

Areas of Expertise: Low-Income Families (With An Emphasis On Employment And Asset Building), Poverty, Income And Wealth Disparities

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: msimms@urban.org
Phone: (202) 261-5709 (Media Relations)

Heard on Marketplace: What Buying Power Buys African Americans

Added August 2015

Last Verified: August 2015

Alexes Harris

Dr. Alexes Harris teaches at the University of Washington and serves as an affiliate at the West Coast Poverty Center and Center for Studies in Demography and Ecology. A driving aim of her work is to produce empirically based research that is theoretically informed, and has real world policy implications for addressing social problems and inequality in the United States. Her most current research examines the sentencing of monetary sanctions, such as fines, fees, and surcharges, to people convicted of felony offenses in Washington state. Using a mixed-method approach, she has analyzed Administrative Office of the Courts data, conducted observations of sentencing and sanctioning hearings, and conducted interviews with court officials to examine variation in sentencing, supervision and sanctioning practices related to unpaid debt.

Harris’ work has been published in a number of academic journals, including The American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Law and Society Review and Symbolic Interaction. With a recently awarded grant, Harris is continuing her research on monetary sanctions to replicate and expand her Washington study in seven other states with collaborators. Harris has testified before the Washington State legislature and Washington State Supreme Court about racial and ethnic inequalities in the criminal justice system and sentencing practices. She was recently appointed by United States Attorney General to a four‐year appointment on the Office of Justice Programs Science Advisory Board.

Alexes Harris

Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Justice Processing and Sentencing of Monetary Sanctions, Race and Ethnicity In The United States

Location: Seattle, WA

Contact Information:

Email: yharris@uw.edu
Website: Alexesharris.com

Heard on NPR Morning Edition: Ferguson’s Plan To Cut Back On Court Fees Could Inspire Change

Added August 2015

Last Verified: August 2015

Van Tran

Van C. Tran teaches sociology at Columbia University. His primary research focuses on the incorporation of post-1965 immigrants and their children as well as its implications for the future of ethnic and racial inequality in the United States. His other scholarly interests include neighborhoods, urban inequality, and population health, with a focus on the Hispanic/Latino population and New York City neighborhoods.

Some of his recent work adopts a comparative approach to the study of migration in the United States, in Europe, and in China. He received his PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard in 2011 and completed his postdoctoral training as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. At Columbia, he is the faculty organizer of the Race, Ethnicity and Migration Workshop and teaches courses on immigration, urban poverty, and research methods.

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Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Race and Ethnicity, Urban Poverty, Neighborhoods and Cities, Social Inequality, Public Policy

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: vantran@columbia.edu
Phone: (212) 854 4115

Heard on Time Warner Cable News New York 1: Population Growing Despite Ever-Increasing Rents

Added June 2015

Rosario Ceballo

Rosario (Rosie) Ceballo, Ph.D. is a clinical and developmental psychologist whose research investigates the effects of living in poverty on children’s development. In particular, she examines the impact of exposure to community violence on children’s academic and psychological functioning.

In another line of research, Dr. Ceballo studies the effects of infertility and racial stereotypes about women’s reproductive abilities on racial/ethnic minority women. Utilizing quantitative as well as qualitative methods, she has published extensively across clinical, developmental, and feminist psychology journals.

Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on an NSF (National Science Foundation) funded longitudinal study with Latino adolescents residing in high-risk, urban neighborhoods. Dr. Ceballo presently serves as a member of the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Committee on Socioeconomic Status, and she is the incoming chair of the Women’s Studies Department at the University of Michigan.

Rosario Ceballo

Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan

Areas of Expertise: After-School Activities, Community Violence; Parenting; Poverty; Infertility; Latino Cultural Values

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Contact Information:
Email: rosarioc@umich.edu
Phone: (734) 936-6049 or (734) 763-2047

Heard on NPR’s Source of the Week: Rosie Ceballo Discusses Role Of ‘Familismo’ As Protective Factor For Latino Adolescents

Added June 2015

Adriana Kugler

Adriana Kugler is a Colombian/American economist and Professor and Vice-Provost for Faculty at the Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy. Her research interests include labor markets and policy evaluation in developed and developing countries. Her current research explores the impact of extensions of unemployment insurance on quality of jobs and match-quality of jobs, and long-term effects of training programs for disadvantaged youth on participants and external impacts on other family members.

Professor Kugler served as Chief Economist of the U.S. Department of Labor under the Obama Administration. Her research and policy work have been covered in The Economist magazine, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, Univision, NPR and in the Joint Economic Committee of Congress. She is a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research and Research Fellow of the Center for Economic Policy Research, Institute for the Study of Labor, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration and the Center for the Study of Poverty and Inequality at Stanford University. She is also Senior Fellow at the Center for American Progress.

Official portrait Adriana Kugler
Vice-Provost for Faculty and Professor, Georgetown University McCourt School of Public Policy

Areas of expertise: Job Creation, Labor Market Policies, Unemployment, Unemployment Insurance Programs, Workforce Investment, Training Programs, Inequality, Poverty, Minorities

Location: Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email:
 ak659@georgetown.edu

Heard on: The Economist’s Ideas Economy: Human Potential

Added May 2015

Anthony Jack

Anthony Abraham Jack is a PhD. Candidate in Sociology and an Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University.

His work examines the present-day experiences of lower-income undergraduates at elite colleges and universities in the context of more expansive race- and class-based affirmative action measures. His dissertation, Same Folks, Different Strokes: Culture, Class, and the “New” Diversity at Elite Colleges and Universities, explores the experiences of lower-income undergraduates who enter college after graduating from boarding, day, and preparatory schools, those who he calls the Privileged Poor, and compares their experiences to their lower-income peers who travel the traditional path from local high schools to college, those who he calls the Doubly Disadvantaged.

Although they share similar origins with respect to family and neighborhoods, he documents how they live ever-more divergent lives before entering college which, then, influences their transition and integration into college. In outlining this overlooked diversity, he sheds new light on how class and culture matter in college. His research also examines how African Americans respond to racism and discrimination in their daily lives. His work appears in the Du Bois Review and Sociological Forum and has been featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and American RadioWorks. He holds fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Science Foundation, and is a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow.

Mather House resident tutor Tony Jack, is a first-generation college student now writing a dissertation on the same topic, which he says is more about class than race. Here he is seen in Mather House and the dining hall where he informally meets with students at meals at Harvard University. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

PhD Candidate in Sociology and Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University

Areas of expertise: (Higher) education, New diversity at elite colleges, Culture, Cultural capital, Race, Urban poverty, Inequality, Youth

Location: Boston, MA

Contact Info:

Email: aajack@fas.harvard.edu

Phone: 617-496-5889

Twitter: @tony_jack

Heard on American RadioWorks: The First Gen Movement

Added May 2015

Malik Washington

Malik Washington is the executive director and CEO of The William Kellibrew Foundation, a community-driven advocacy organization “dedicated to breaking the cycles of violence and poverty.” He is also the training & outreach specialist with the DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence, an organization that serves as a “resource for the thousands of adults and children experiencing domestic violence in the District each year.”

He joined The William Kellibrew Foundation in 2010 as a member of the national advisory council where he implemented a mentoring program for young men in Washington, D.C.

Washington studied radio, television and film at Howard University. His community outreach experience includes organizing mission trips and providing disaster relief services with the Christian organization In His Presence Ministries. He’s a contributor to NPR’s Tell Me Moreblog and was previously a Tell Me More intern and editorial assistant.

Malik Washington
Executive Director and CEO, The William Kellibrew Foundation
Training & Outreach Specialist, DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence 

Areas of Expertise: Youth, Poverty, and Violence (especially Young Men), Mentorship, Community Outreach, Writing & Blogging, Media, African Americans

Location: Pittsburgh, PA, and Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: malikjwashington@gmail.com
Twitter: @malikwashington
Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: How Should We Be Talking About Sex?

Added January 2013

Last Verified September 2015