Isabel Araiza

Dr. Isabel Araiza is an associate professor of sociology at Texas A&M Corpus Christi, where she teaches in the Mexican American and women and gender studies programs. She’s an expert on sociology and its intersections with education, social class and inequality. 

Araiza has also spoken up against the university’s plans for in-person classes this fall despite the coronavirus pandemic. Many schools have abandoned plans for in-person instruction this fall due to outbreaks — most notably, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made the rest of the semester entirely online after 130 students tested positive in the first week of classes.

Araiza’s recent research has focused on access to clean water, the political preferences of Latinos, Hispanic serving institutions of higher education in Texas and the community impact of the integration of Corpus Christi Independent School District in the 1970s.

Born and raised in Corpus Christi, Araiza went on to earn her PhD in sociology from Boston College. As a public sociologist actively engaged in her community, Araiza is a founding member of For the Greater Good, a local advocacy organization that pushes for access to clean water and investment in public institutions and infrastructure.

She’s also co-authored several health needs assessments on the community needs and uses of hospitals in the Coastal Bend region of South Texas.

Location: Corpus Christi, TX

Expertise Field: Universities and the coronavirus, sociology, Mexican American studies, women and gender studies, social class, education, inequality 

Contact information:

Email: isabel.araiza@tamucc.edu

Phone (cell): 361-779-3927

Phone (office): 361-825-3936

Listen to Isabel Araiza on KIII:

Last updated August 24, 2020

Christen A. Smith

Dr. Christen A. Smith is an associate professor of anthropology and African and African diaspora studies and the director of the Center for Women’s and Gender Studies at The University of Texas at Austin. She’s an expert on Black liberation and state violence against Black communities in the Americas.

Smith can provide context on the anthropological background of police violence against Black communities. Her recent research examines the lingering and deadly impacts of police violence on Black women, communities and families in the U.S. and Brazil.

Her 2016 book Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence and Performance in Brazil explores the ironic relationship between police violence against Black Brazilians in Salvador, Bahia and the celebration and consumption of Black culture, music and art.

Smith is also the founder of Cite Black Women, which promotes the intellectual and academic work of Black women — historically overlooked and undervalued. Through a blog, podcast and social media campaign, the project pushes people to reexamine their blind spots on race and gender and start using and citing the work of Black female sources.

Location: Austin, TX

Expertise: Black liberation, resistance and state violence against Black communities in the Americas

Contact information:

Email: christen.smith@austin.utexas.edu

Twitter: @profsassy

Listen to Christen A. Smith on KQED’s World Affairs:

Last updated July 22, 2020

Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw is a professor at Columbia Law School and UCLA Law School. Her work focuses on racial and social justice and gender equality. Intersectionality and Critical Race Theory are academic disciplines that have emerged from her work. Crenshaw is also the Executive Director and Co Founder of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School. She has been instrumental in international organizational events such as the United Nations’ World Conference on Racism and the conference for Expert Group on Gender and Race Discrimination. She has also been an influential voice in racial justice campaigns such as “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women” and “Black Girls Matter”. Crenshaw’s articles can be found in Ms.Magazine, Harvard Law Review, National Black Law Journal, Southern California Law Review and has appeared on MSNBC, NPR and “The Tavis Smiley Show”.
The American Bar Foundation named Crenshaw the 2016 Fellows Outstanding Scholar.

Kimberle Crenshaw
Kimberle Crenshaw

Professor of Law at Columbia and UCLA

Areas of Expertise: gender equality, race, social and racial justice, affirmative action, violence against women. structural racial inequality

Location: New York and Los Angeles

Contact Info
Email: crenshaw@law.columbia.edu
Twitter: @sandylocks

 

Heard on NPR’s Morning Edition: The Promise of Diversity Is Yet To Be Fulfilled