Isabel Araiza

Dr. Isabel Araiza is an associate professor of sociology at Texas A&M Corpus Christi, where she teaches in the Mexican American and women and gender studies programs. She’s an expert on sociology and its intersections with education, social class and inequality. 

Araiza has also spoken up against the university’s plans for in-person classes this fall despite the coronavirus pandemic. Many schools have abandoned plans for in-person instruction this fall due to outbreaks — most notably, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill made the rest of the semester entirely online after 130 students tested positive in the first week of classes.

Araiza’s recent research has focused on access to clean water, the political preferences of Latinos, Hispanic serving institutions of higher education in Texas and the community impact of the integration of Corpus Christi Independent School District in the 1970s.

Born and raised in Corpus Christi, Araiza went on to earn her PhD in sociology from Boston College. As a public sociologist actively engaged in her community, Araiza is a founding member of For the Greater Good, a local advocacy organization that pushes for access to clean water and investment in public institutions and infrastructure.

She’s also co-authored several health needs assessments on the community needs and uses of hospitals in the Coastal Bend region of South Texas.

Location: Corpus Christi, TX

Expertise Field: Universities and the coronavirus, sociology, Mexican American studies, women and gender studies, social class, education, inequality 

Contact information:

Email: isabel.araiza@tamucc.edu

Phone (cell): 361-779-3927

Phone (office): 361-825-3936

Listen to Isabel Araiza on KIII:

Last updated August 24, 2020

Eve Ewing

Eve L. Ewing is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago. Her current research is focused on racism, social inequality, urban policy, and the impact these forces have on American public schools and the lives of young people.

Ewing is also a fellow at the Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago and a Civic Media Fellow at the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California. She co-directs Crescendo Literary, a partnership that develops community-engaged arts events and education resources. She’s also an essayist and poet. Her first collection of poetry, essays, and visual art, Electric Arches, was published in September 2017. You can find her pieces in many different outlets including The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, and The Washington Post.

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Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar and Fellow at Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago

Location: Chicago, IL

Areas of Expertise: Racism, Social Inequality and Urban Policy in Public School Systems, Sociology of Education

Contact Information:

E-mail: eveewing.com/contact
Twitter: @eveewing

Tressie McMillan Cottom

Tressie McMillan Cottom teaches sociology at Virginia Commonwealth University. She is also an affiliated faculty at The Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University and contributing editor at Dissent magazine. Her current research focuses on inequalities in education, technology and work, which includes a study of for-profit colleges in the U.S., inequalities among “public intellectuals” and social media practices in institutions.

McMillan Cottom’s research aims to understand how inequalities manifest in the new economy and how those inequalities can be addressed. In addition to teaching and researching, she has advised academic, community and political organizations on matters of race/gender/class inequality, higher education and workforce development. McMillan Cottom also consults with universities and non-profit organizations on public scholarship, technology and organizational change.

Tressie McMillan Cottom
Assistant Professor of Sociology, Virginia Commonwealth University

Areas of Expertise: For-profit Higher Education, Digital Inequalities, Transition Points from Student to Worker

Location: Richmond, VA

Contact Information:
Email:
tmcottom@vcu.edu
Twitter: @tressiemcphd

Heard in Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society’s Luncheon Series:
Democratizing Ideologies and Inequality Regimes in Digital Domains

 

Van Tran

Van C. Tran teaches sociology at Columbia University. His primary research focuses on the incorporation of post-1965 immigrants and their children as well as its implications for the future of ethnic and racial inequality in the United States. His other scholarly interests include neighborhoods, urban inequality, and population health, with a focus on the Hispanic/Latino population and New York City neighborhoods.

Some of his recent work adopts a comparative approach to the study of migration in the United States, in Europe, and in China. He received his PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard in 2011 and completed his postdoctoral training as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. At Columbia, he is the faculty organizer of the Race, Ethnicity and Migration Workshop and teaches courses on immigration, urban poverty, and research methods.

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Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Race and Ethnicity, Urban Poverty, Neighborhoods and Cities, Social Inequality, Public Policy

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: vantran@columbia.edu
Phone: (212) 854 4115

Heard on Time Warner Cable News New York 1: Population Growing Despite Ever-Increasing Rents

Added June 2015

Anthony Jack

Anthony Abraham Jack is a PhD. Candidate in Sociology and an Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University.

His work examines the present-day experiences of lower-income undergraduates at elite colleges and universities in the context of more expansive race- and class-based affirmative action measures. His dissertation, Same Folks, Different Strokes: Culture, Class, and the “New” Diversity at Elite Colleges and Universities, explores the experiences of lower-income undergraduates who enter college after graduating from boarding, day, and preparatory schools, those who he calls the Privileged Poor, and compares their experiences to their lower-income peers who travel the traditional path from local high schools to college, those who he calls the Doubly Disadvantaged.

Although they share similar origins with respect to family and neighborhoods, he documents how they live ever-more divergent lives before entering college which, then, influences their transition and integration into college. In outlining this overlooked diversity, he sheds new light on how class and culture matter in college. His research also examines how African Americans respond to racism and discrimination in their daily lives. His work appears in the Du Bois Review and Sociological Forum and has been featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and American RadioWorks. He holds fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Science Foundation, and is a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow.

Mather House resident tutor Tony Jack, is a first-generation college student now writing a dissertation on the same topic, which he says is more about class than race. Here he is seen in Mather House and the dining hall where he informally meets with students at meals at Harvard University. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

PhD Candidate in Sociology and Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University

Areas of expertise: (Higher) education, New diversity at elite colleges, Culture, Cultural capital, Race, Urban poverty, Inequality, Youth

Location: Boston, MA

Contact Info:

Email: aajack@fas.harvard.edu

Phone: 617-496-5889

Twitter: @tony_jack

Heard on American RadioWorks: The First Gen Movement

Added May 2015

Marifeli Perez-Stable

Marifeli Perez-Stable is a Professor of Sociology at Florida International University, and writes a biweekly column for the Miami Herald on Latin American issues.

Perez-Stable is the former vice president for democratic governance at the Inter-American Dialogue in Washington, DC. In April 2003, she chaired the Task Force on Memory, Truth, and Justice which published the report, Cuban National Reconciliation. Perez-Stableis the director of “National Dialogues on Democracy in Latin America, a project sponsored by the Inter-American Dialogue with the cooperation of the Organization of American States.

She is currently working on Intimate Enemies, a book about the United States and Cuba after the Cold War.

perez stable

Professor of Sociology at Florida International University

Areas of Expertise: US-Cuba Relations, Sociology, Cuban Politics and History

Location: Miami, FL

Contact:

Phone: (305) 348-1296
Email: stablem@fiu.edu

Heard on NPR All Things Considered: In Miami, Praise For Honduran President’s Ouster

Added January 2015

Last Verified: January 2015

Guillermo Grenier

Guillermo Grenier is a Professor of Sociology and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Global & Sociocultural Studies in the School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University.

Over the past 25 years he has been a lead investigator of the FIU Cuba Poll, an annual poll of Cuban-Americans, which is a  project cosponsored by the Cuban Research Institute.

Grenier has authored or coauthored six books and dozens of articles on labor, migration, immigrant incorporation, and Cuban-American ideological profiles, particularly in the Greater Miami area.

grenier

Professor of Sociology and Graduate Program Director in the Department of Global & Sociocultural Studies in the School of International and Public Affairs at Florida International University

Areas of Expertise: Polling, Cultural Studies, Latin America, Immigration, Cuban Immigrants, Sociology

Location: Miami, FL

Contact:

Phone: (305) 348-3217

Email: Guillermo.grenier@fiu.edu

Added February 2015

Last Verified: February 2015

Jennifer Eberhardt

Jennifer L. Eberhardt is an Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and a 2014 MacArthur Fellow. Eberhardt is a Social Psychologist with nearly 20 years of teaching and research work, much of it focused on what she describes as “the stereotypical associations between blacks and crime.” Since 1998, Eberhardt has been at Stanford University, where she is an Associate Professor of Psychology and co-director of Social Psychological Answers to Real-World Questions (SPARQ).

Eberhardt received her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1993, and began her teaching career at Yale University, working in Psychology, African, and African American Studies Departments, while also being a research fellow at the Center for Race, Inequality, and Politics. In addition to Eberhardt’s research on racial profiling, she’s currently assisting law enforcement agencies to develop improved methods of serving their communities, and working with colleagues from other scientific disciplines on a new way to explain cognitive dehumanization by breaking down it’s process and how it aids in discrimination and marginalization in our society.

She has spoken on various panels, at Stanford University’s panel discussing how race alters perception of people, places, and things, at the U.S. Department of Justice with the Racial Disparities Working Group, and at the Ford Foundation Conference on a panel discussing ‘Renewing Communities: Improving educational access in California’s correctional facilities and beyond.’ In addition, Eberhardt has been quoted in the Stanford News, the Oakland Tribune, and co-authored an op-ed for The New York Times.

2014 MacArthur Award Winner Jennifer Eberhardt, Stanford University.

2014 MacArthur Fellow and Associate Professor of Psychology at Stanford University

Areas of Expertise: Sociology, Science, Racial Stereotyping, Psychology, Human Development, Law

Location: Stanford, CA

Contact Information:

Email: jleberhardt@stanford.edu

Dr. Eberhardt’s assistant, Lynda Ichinaga
Email: ichinaga@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 725-2449

Heard on the MacArthur Foundation Website: Introducing Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Added December 2014

Keisha Bentley-Edwards

Dr. Keisha L. Bentley-Edwards is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Human Development & Culture and Learning Sciences Faculty Affiliate, African & African Diaspora Studies Department, at the University of Texas at Austin.

Bentley-Edwards researches the experiences of youth in racial socialization, looking into sociopolitical agency and cohesion among African Americans, as well as white racial socialization, and the messages that white parents provide to their children around race.

Her work examines how cultural strengths can be used to minimize the negative outcomes related to racism stress, violence, aggression, bullying, and community stressors.

Keisha Bentley-Edwards
Assistant Professor in the Department of Educational Psychology, Human Development & Culture and Learning Sciences Faculty Affiliate, African & African Diaspora Studies Department, University of Texas at Austin

Areas of Expertise: Psychological Development of the African American Experience in the United States, Adolescent Racial Socialization, Human Development, Culture, Learning Sciences

Location: Austin, TX (September-May); Durham, NC (June-August)

Contact Information:
Email:
kbentleyedwards@austin.utexas.edu
Phone: (714) 614-0728 (c)
Twitter:
@Keisha_Bentley

Heard on NPR Source of the Week: Dr. Bentley-Edwards Discusses The Reaction After Ferguson

Jennifer Lee

Jennifer Lee is a professor of sociology at the University of California, Irvine, where she focuses on the intersection of immigration and race/ethnicity. Her research covers immigration, social inequality and Asian American studies.

According to her bio, much of Lee’s work centers on the “ways in which contemporary immigrants affect native-born Americans, and also, how native-born Americans affect patterns of immigrant and second-generation incorporation.” She is the author of numerous academic papers and books, including “Civility in the City: Blacks, Jews, and Koreans in Urban America,” and co-author of “The Diversity Paradox: Immigration and the Color Line in 21st Century America.”

Since 2011, Lee has been a fellow at the Center for Social Cohesion. She has written for Time online, The Guardian, Seattle Times (with fellow SOTW Karthick Ramakrishnan) and Zocalo Public Square and has had her work featured on CBS and Colorlines.com.

Professor of Sociology at University of California, Irvine, and Fellow at the Center for Social Cohesion

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Children of Immigrants (Second-Generation Americans), Race/Ethnicity, Social Inequality, Asian Americans’ Education and Identities, Mexican American Mobility, Multiracial Americans & Identities

Location: Irvine, CA

Contact Info: 

Phone: (949) 824-7011

Email: jenlee@uci.edu

Featured on Zocalo Public Square