Carla Fredericks

Carla Fredericks is the director of the American Indian Law Clinic at the University of Colorado Law School and of the indigenous advocacy organization First Peoples Worldwide. She’s an expert on Native American law, rights and tribal sovereignty.

As part of the broader movement for racial justice following George Floyd’s death — and after years of resistance — Washington’s NFL team is finally considering a name change following pressure from corporate sponsors like FedEx.

But Fredericks says that’s not the whole story: FedEx did not turn on a dime. Instead, native activists have been pressuring investors and business partners of the NFL team for more than a decade. And the push isn’t over — the Cleveland Indians are also considering a name change, while the Atlanta Braves are not.

Fredericks can provide context on the long campaign by Native activists to change the name of the D.C. team and how Native Americans and the fight for tribal sovereignty fit into the broader movement for racial justice.

Before joining the University of Colorado, Fredericks was a partner at Milberg LLP in New York. She maintains a pro bono practice, and provided legal counsel to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe during and after the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.

She’s also published many studies and papers including Social Cost and Material Loss: The Dakota Access Pipeline, which found that backers lost at least $12 billion due to the legal battles and controversy surrounding the project.

Fredericks is an enrolled citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara Nation of North Dakota.

Location: Boulder, CO

Expertise: Native American law, rights and sovereignty

Contact information:

Email: Carla.Fredericks@Colorado.EDU 

Phone: (303) 492-7079

Listen to Carla Fredericks on Colorado Public Radio:

Last updated July 9, 2020

Matthew Fletcher

Matthew L.M. Fletcher is a Professor of Law at Michigan State University College of Law, and Director of the Indigenous Law and Policy Center. He is the primary editor and author of the leading law blog on American Indian law and policy, Turtle Talk.

In addition to his academic work, he is an appellate judge for the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court of Appeals, the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians Appellate Court, the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians Tribal Court of Appeals, and the Chief Appellate Judge for the Poarch Band of Creek Indians Supreme Court.

Fletcher specializes in a number of areas of law, especially pertaining to federal law and Indian Tribes, Indian law and policy, and has written a number of scholarly papers. He has authored several books; American Indian Education: Counternarratives in Racism, Struggle, and the Law; American Indian Tribal Law; and edited Facing the Future: the Indian Child Welfare Act at 30.

Fletcher is a citizen of the Grand Traverse Band, located in Peshawbestown, Michigan.

He has appeared on Wyoming Public Radio, and The Fronteras Changing America Desk.

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Michigan State University College of Law Professor, and Director of the Indigenous Law & Policy Center

Areas of Expertise: Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), Federal Law, Federal Indian Law, Tribal Law, Indian Law & Policy, Land Claims, Tribal Indian Gaming

Location: East Lansing, MI

Contact Information:

Email: matthew.fletcher@law.msu.edu

Phone: (517) 432-6909

Heard on The Fronteras Desk SCOTUS Rules On Native American Child Custody

Kimberly TallBear

Kim TallBear is an Associate Professor of Native Studies at the University of Alberta in Canada and Research Chair in its department of Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience and Environment. An enrolled member of the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate tribe in South Dakota, her research focuses on the relationship between science and race/identity among Native American peoples.

TallBear’s most recent book, Native American DNA: Tribal Belonging and the False Promise of Genetic Science, examines the scientific premise behind Native Americans’ ownership (or former ownership) of lands and natural resources. She has traveled to the United States, Canada and United Kingdom to share her commentary on issues related to indigenous peoples, science and technology.

Associate Professor of Native Studies and Research Chair in Indigenous Peoples, Technoscience & Environment, University of Alberta

Location: Edmonton, Canada

Areas of Expertise: Indigenous peoples, environmental science, genetics, native studies, sexuality, race/identity

Contact Information

E-mail: tallbear@ualberta.ca

Listen to Kim TallBear here:

Dina Gilio-Walker

Dina Gilio-Walker is Policy Director and Senior Research Associate at the Center for World Indigenous Studies. A member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, her research interests include political autonomy among indigenous nations and the complex relationship between Native American communities and  modern America. Additionally, she has completed research in critical sports studies, specifically as it relates to the intersection of indigenous culture and the sport of surfing.

Walker’s latest book, “All the Real Indians Died Off” and 20 Other Myths About Native Americans examines the most commonly-held myths and commonly-held beliefs about Native American culture and history. She is a frequent contributor to the Indian Country Media Network and her commentary has been featured by a number of news outlets including the Boston Globe, Mic.com and CSPAN Book Talk.

Whitaker
Policy Director and Senior Research Associate, Center for World Indigenous Studies

Location: San Clemente, CA

Areas of Expertise: Native American culture, critical sports studies, indigenous peoples, surfing, Native American history, higher education

Contact Information:
E-mail:
dinagwhitaker@gmail.com
Phone: (949) 612-5276
Twitter: @DinaGWhit

Patty Loew

Patty Loew is a journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University. As a member of the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Ojibwe, she focuses primarily on indigenous rights, sovereignty and the role of Native media.

Loew is a former broadcast journalist and has produced numerous documentaries and pieces for public and commercial television examining Native issues and culture. Her award-winning documentary Way of the Warrior premiered nationally on PBS in 2007.


Journalism professor and director of the Center for Native American and Indigenous Research at Northwestern University

Areas of Expertise: Ojibwe Treaty Rights, Indigenous Sovereignty, Role of Native Media in Communication Indigenous World Views, Social Media, Indigenous Cultural Expression

Location: Evanston, IL

Contact Information:
Email: patricia.loew@northwestern.edu
Phone: 847-491-4837

Heard on WUWM: The Lake Effect: “Professor: State Will ‘Drive a Wedge’ Between Indian Nations Over Casino”

Last updated August 12, 2020