Jayce Farmer

Dr. Jayce Farmer is an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy and Leadership at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He’s an expert in public finance and state and local government administration and can provide insight on how the coronavirus has devastated state and local government budgets.

Farmer has more than a decade of experience in public fiscal administration — before joining UNLV, he worked as a policy and budget analyst for local governments in Florida. There, he coordinated and managed the capital budget process for municipalities and oversaw the implementation of several large municipal government funds.

He has also advised appointed and elected local officials and, in 2016, conducted several citizen satisfaction surveys for municipalities in Central Texas.

Farmer’s research into local government policy and fiscal issues has been published in The American Review of Public Administration, Public Budgeting and Finance, Urban Affairs Review, Public Performance & Management Review, and Publius: The Journal of Federalism.

Location: Las Vegas, NV

Expertise Field: Public finance, state and local governance, public policy, urban affairs

Contact information:

Email: Jayce.Farmer@unlv.edu 

Phone: 702-972-5878

Twitter: @JayceFarmer

Listen to Jayce Farmer on KNPR:

Last updated August 3, 2020

Shalanda Baker

Shalanda Baker is a Professor of Law, Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University. She is an expert on energy and environmental policy.

Baker also found the Energy Justice Program at the William S. Richardson School of Law of the University of Hawai’i. She is also a Fulbright scholar and completed a William H. Hastie Fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Law School.

Prior to teaching, she worked as a corporate and project finance associate for the law firm Bingham McCutchen.

baker-s

Areas of Expertise: Energy Policy, Environmental Policy, Sustainable Development 

Location: Boston, Massachusetts

Contact Info:

Email: s.baker@northeastern.edu

Phone: (617) 373-4070

She can be heard here:

Tracey Ross

Tracey Ross is the Associate Director of the All-In Cities Initiative at PolicyLink, an initiative that helps cities across the country adopt policies and practices to promote equitable growth. She also serves as a delegate to the U.S.-Japan Leadership program, which fosters connections between leaders in both countries. Ross began her career as a Senate staffer, and has also been a Senior Policy Analyst at the Center for American Progress, where she focused on urban poverty and environmental justice. She has written for the New York Times and the Washington Post, and been featured on MSNBC and Al Jazeera English.

Tracey Ross

Areas of Expertise: Public policy involving growth, economic progress,  racial economic inclusion, U.S.-Japanese relations

Location: Oakland, CA

Contact Info:

Contact Info:

Email: tracey@policylink.org

Phone: 510-703-1866

 

She can be heard here:

Eve Ewing

Eve L. Ewing is a Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar at the University of Chicago. Her current research is focused on racism, social inequality, urban policy, and the impact these forces have on American public schools and the lives of young people.

Ewing is also a fellow at the Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago and a Civic Media Fellow at the Annenberg Innovation Lab at the University of Southern California. She co-directs Crescendo Literary, a partnership that develops community-engaged arts events and education resources. She’s also an essayist and poet. Her first collection of poetry, essays, and visual art, Electric Arches, was published in September 2017. You can find her pieces in many different outlets including The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Atlantic, and The Washington Post.

_R2A2017.JPG

Provost’s Postdoctoral Scholar and Fellow at Center for Race, Politics, and Culture at the University of Chicago

Location: Chicago, IL

Areas of Expertise: Racism, Social Inequality and Urban Policy in Public School Systems, Sociology of Education

Contact Information:

E-mail: eveewing.com/contact
Twitter: @eveewing

Van Tran

Van C. Tran teaches sociology at Columbia University. His primary research focuses on the incorporation of post-1965 immigrants and their children as well as its implications for the future of ethnic and racial inequality in the United States. His other scholarly interests include neighborhoods, urban inequality, and population health, with a focus on the Hispanic/Latino population and New York City neighborhoods.

Some of his recent work adopts a comparative approach to the study of migration in the United States, in Europe, and in China. He received his PhD in Sociology and Social Policy from Harvard in 2011 and completed his postdoctoral training as a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013. At Columbia, he is the faculty organizer of the Race, Ethnicity and Migration Workshop and teaches courses on immigration, urban poverty, and research methods.

00

Assistant Professor of Sociology at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Immigration, Race and Ethnicity, Urban Poverty, Neighborhoods and Cities, Social Inequality, Public Policy

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

Email: vantran@columbia.edu
Phone: (212) 854 4115

Heard on Time Warner Cable News New York 1: Population Growing Despite Ever-Increasing Rents

Added June 2015

Anthony Jack

Anthony Abraham Jack is a PhD. Candidate in Sociology and an Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University.

His work examines the present-day experiences of lower-income undergraduates at elite colleges and universities in the context of more expansive race- and class-based affirmative action measures. His dissertation, Same Folks, Different Strokes: Culture, Class, and the “New” Diversity at Elite Colleges and Universities, explores the experiences of lower-income undergraduates who enter college after graduating from boarding, day, and preparatory schools, those who he calls the Privileged Poor, and compares their experiences to their lower-income peers who travel the traditional path from local high schools to college, those who he calls the Doubly Disadvantaged.

Although they share similar origins with respect to family and neighborhoods, he documents how they live ever-more divergent lives before entering college which, then, influences their transition and integration into college. In outlining this overlooked diversity, he sheds new light on how class and culture matter in college. His research also examines how African Americans respond to racism and discrimination in their daily lives. His work appears in the Du Bois Review and Sociological Forum and has been featured in the New York Times, Boston Globe, and American RadioWorks. He holds fellowships from the Ford Foundation and the National Science Foundation, and is a 2015 National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellow.

Mather House resident tutor Tony Jack, is a first-generation college student now writing a dissertation on the same topic, which he says is more about class than race. Here he is seen in Mather House and the dining hall where he informally meets with students at meals at Harvard University. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

PhD Candidate in Sociology and Associate Doctoral Fellow in the Multidisciplinary Program in Inequality & Social Policy at Harvard University

Areas of expertise: (Higher) education, New diversity at elite colleges, Culture, Cultural capital, Race, Urban poverty, Inequality, Youth

Location: Boston, MA

Contact Info:

Email: aajack@fas.harvard.edu

Phone: 617-496-5889

Twitter: @tony_jack

Heard on American RadioWorks: The First Gen Movement

Added May 2015