Lisa Fontes

Lisa A. Fontes is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Her research focuses on topics related to culture and violence against intimate partners and children.

Fontes is the author of the books: Invisible Chains: Overcoming Coercive Control in Your Intimate Relationship, Interviewing Clients Across Cultures, and Child Abuse and Culture.

She has worked as a family, individual, and group psychotherapist, and has conducted research in Santiago, Chile, and with diverse people in the United States. Fontes works in Guyana and Peru on issues of child sexual abuse.

s200_lisa.fontes

Areas of Expertise: Sexual violence, domestic violence, coercive control, child abuse

Location: Amherst, Massachusetts

Contact Info:

Email: LFontes@umass.edu

 Phone: 413-575-9505

She can be heard here:

José Miguel Cruz

José Miguel Cruz is the Director of Research at Florida International University’s Kimberly Green Latin American and Caribbean Center. He is an expert in the area of criminal violence, gangs, police, democratization and public opinion in Latin America. He has written about American scholarship on gangs and the processes through which the maras (MS-13 and MS-18) have evolved.

Jose Miguel Cruz

Director of Research, Florida International University’s Latin American and Caribbean Center

Areas of Expertise: Criminal Violence, Gangs, Police, Democratization and Public Opinion in Latin America

Location: Miami, FL

Contact Info:

Email: jomcruz@fiu.edu

Phone: (615) 945-7487

Heard on C-Span:

Magdalena Cerdá

Magdalena Cerdá is an Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of California, Davis. Her research focuses primarily on two areas: (1) the causes, consequences, and prevention of violence; and (2) the social and policy determinants of substance use from childhood to adulthood.

Her current studies include a simulation of the impact that different types of firearms disqualification criteria could have on rates of firearm-related violence, as well as other research focused on prescription drugs, opioid overdose, and marijuana legalization.

Magdalena Cerda photo
Associate Professor in the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis

Areas of Expertise: Firearms, Firearms Violence, Violence Prevention, Social Determinants of Health, Neighborhoods and Health, Drug and Alcohol Use, Trauma

Location: Davis, CA

Contact Information:
E-mail: cerda@ucdavis.edu | magda.cerda@gmail.com
Phone: (916) 734-3539

Clip from Talk Given by Cerdá: “Neighborhood Influences On Violence: Building Evidence That Leads To Intervention”

Bindu Kalesan

Bindu Kalesan, MPH., Ph.D. teaches epidemiology at Columbia University as an adjunct assistant professor. She also serves as the Vice-President of Gun Violence Survivors Foundation. She is a clinical epidemiologist and biostatistician who has collaborated with clinical researchers and other scientists performing research studies in cardiovascular and injury epidemiology. Her current research focuses on the public health consequences of gun violence in the United States along with short and long term health outcomes of patients receiving treatment for cardiovascular diseases.

Dr. Kalesan was born in India, having completed her MPH from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, MD and PhD from University of Bern, Switzerland, is now settled in the US. She has over 12 years of cumulative experience in research and teaching. Her recent research on fatal and non-fatal gun injuries has earned international experience in this field and is one of the most sought after experts in gun violence research.

Adjunct Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University

Areas of Expertise: Public Health Consequences of Gun Violence, Social Gun Culture and Gun Ownership, Depression and Firearm-Related Injury; Racial and Ethnic Heterogeneity in Trends of Firearm-Related Fatality 

Location: New York, NY

Contact Information:

E-mail: kb2693@columbia.edu

Heard on C-Span’s Washington Journal: Gun Ownership in the U.S. 

Added December 2015

Last Verified: December 2015

Seema Yasmin

Seema Yasmin is a reporter at the Dallas Morning News, professor of public health at the University of Texas at Dallas and Medical Contributor for both CNN and NBC Channel 5. An expert in epidemiology, she has served as a disease detective at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has her own column for the Dallas Morning News called ‘Debunked’, which exposes medical myths.

Yasmin has examined epidemics in Kenya, Botswana, the United Kingdom and the Americas, working in environments ranging from maximum security prisons to American Indian reservations. Her work has appeared in peer-reviewed journals as well as the Scientific American and Reuters. In 2016 her reporting on Chagas Disease won an Emmy for Continued Coverage. The same year, her first collection of poetry won the Diode Editions chapbook contest.

Reporter at Dallas Morning News and Professor of Public Health at University of Texas at Dallas

Location: Washington, D.C.

Areas of Expertise: Epidemiology, journalism, media studies, gender-based violence, public health, multimedia storytelling

Contact Information:

E-mail: seemayasmin@gmail.com
Twitter: @DoctorYasmin

https://www.npr.org/player/embed/485204926/485204927

Cecily Hardaway

Cecily Hardaway researches at Duke University’s Social Science Research Institute. Hardaway’s primary line of research investigates links between poverty-related risks (e.g., exposure to community violence, economic hardship, and household chaos) and adolescents’ socioemotional adjustment and academic achievement. She is particularly interested in identifying processes that help us understand why poverty-related risks are, in fact, risks and pinpointing ways that low-income adolescents may be protected from these risks.

Her most recent work has focused on how exposure to community violence is associated with low-income adolescents’ mental health and behavior as well as identifying factors within the family and community that help protect adolescents from the consequences of exposure to community violence. Hardaway’s research has been published in psychology, family studies, and child/adolescent development journals, including the Journal of Youth and Adolescence, the American Journal of Community Psychology, and the Psychology of Violence.

Cecily Hardaway

Research Scientist at Duke University’s Social Science Research Institute

Areas of Expertise: Exposure to Community Violence, Poverty, Adolescent Development, Family Processes, Low-Income Families

Location: Durham, NC

Contact Information:

Email: cecily.hardaway@duke.edu

Heard on Source of the Week: Cecily Hardaway Discussing Exposure To Community Violence

Added September 2015

Last Verified: September 2015

Rosario Ceballo

Rosario (Rosie) Ceballo, Ph.D. is a clinical and developmental psychologist whose research investigates the effects of living in poverty on children’s development. In particular, she examines the impact of exposure to community violence on children’s academic and psychological functioning.

In another line of research, Dr. Ceballo studies the effects of infertility and racial stereotypes about women’s reproductive abilities on racial/ethnic minority women. Utilizing quantitative as well as qualitative methods, she has published extensively across clinical, developmental, and feminist psychology journals.

Currently, she is the Principal Investigator on an NSF (National Science Foundation) funded longitudinal study with Latino adolescents residing in high-risk, urban neighborhoods. Dr. Ceballo presently serves as a member of the American Psychological Association’s (APA) Committee on Socioeconomic Status, and she is the incoming chair of the Women’s Studies Department at the University of Michigan.

Rosario Ceballo

Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan

Areas of Expertise: After-School Activities, Community Violence; Parenting; Poverty; Infertility; Latino Cultural Values

Location: Ann Arbor, MI

Contact Information:
Email: rosarioc@umich.edu
Phone: (734) 936-6049 or (734) 763-2047

Heard on NPR’s Source of the Week: Rosie Ceballo Discusses Role Of ‘Familismo’ As Protective Factor For Latino Adolescents

Added June 2015

Malik Washington

Malik Washington is the executive director and CEO of The William Kellibrew Foundation, a community-driven advocacy organization “dedicated to breaking the cycles of violence and poverty.” He is also the training & outreach specialist with the DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence, an organization that serves as a “resource for the thousands of adults and children experiencing domestic violence in the District each year.”

He joined The William Kellibrew Foundation in 2010 as a member of the national advisory council where he implemented a mentoring program for young men in Washington, D.C.

Washington studied radio, television and film at Howard University. His community outreach experience includes organizing mission trips and providing disaster relief services with the Christian organization In His Presence Ministries. He’s a contributor to NPR’s Tell Me Moreblog and was previously a Tell Me More intern and editorial assistant.

Malik Washington
Executive Director and CEO, The William Kellibrew Foundation
Training & Outreach Specialist, DC Coalition Against Domestic Violence 

Areas of Expertise: Youth, Poverty, and Violence (especially Young Men), Mentorship, Community Outreach, Writing & Blogging, Media, African Americans

Location: Pittsburgh, PA, and Washington, DC

Contact Information:
Email: malikjwashington@gmail.com
Twitter: @malikwashington
Heard on NPR: For a complete list, click here.

Tell Me More: How Should We Be Talking About Sex?

Added January 2013

Last Verified September 2015