Kimberlé Crenshaw

Kimberlé Crenshaw is a professor at Columbia Law School and UCLA Law School. Her work focuses on racial and social justice and gender equality. Intersectionality and Critical Race Theory are academic disciplines that have emerged from her work. Crenshaw is also the Executive Director and Co Founder of the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies at Columbia Law School. She has been instrumental in international organizational events such as the United Nations’ World Conference on Racism and the conference for Expert Group on Gender and Race Discrimination. She has also been an influential voice in racial justice campaigns such as “Say Her Name: Resisting Police Brutality Against Black Women” and “Black Girls Matter”. Crenshaw’s articles can be found in Ms.Magazine, Harvard Law Review, National Black Law Journal, Southern California Law Review and has appeared on MSNBC, NPR and “The Tavis Smiley Show”.
The American Bar Foundation named Crenshaw the 2016 Fellows Outstanding Scholar.

Kimberle Crenshaw
Kimberle Crenshaw

Professor of Law at Columbia and UCLA

Areas of Expertise: gender equality, race, social and racial justice, affirmative action, violence against women. structural racial inequality

Location: New York and Los Angeles

Contact Info
Email: crenshaw@law.columbia.edu
Twitter: @sandylocks

 

Heard on NPR’s Morning Edition: The Promise of Diversity Is Yet To Be Fulfilled 

Sarah Deer: Tribal Law, Domestic Assault and Sexual Violence, Victim Rights, Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) 

“…right now the tribal government, which would be the closest government to where the crime occurs, cannot take action if the perpetrator is not a Native American. So, in those situations a victim would be relying on the federal government to respond to that crime and then follow through with prosecution." 

Click on her photo to learn more. 

Janine Parry: Polling, Public Opinion, and Women and Politics

“I can say from 15 years of polling and 10,000 interviews that Arkansans are, in some ways, a little slower to adopt things, changes that are coming around the nation. So I think, you know, 10, 15 years from now, we might be having the conversations that other cities and states are having now.”

Click on her photo to learn more.

Crystal Wright: Conservative Black Chick

“When you talk about the history of the Republican Party, when you talk about the fact that Lincoln and Republicans from before slavery through to 1964 and beyond with President Nixon, Republicans are the ones who fought for civil rights, who fought for opportunities for blacks.”

Click on her photo for more information.

image

Farai Chideya: Media, Technology and Diversity

“I think that, you know, everybody wants good health care, they just don’t know how they want it. And it’s a lot easier to reject a flawed plan than it is to come up with a workable one.”

Click her photo to learn more.